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MA 2009
STAR TREK
Box Office Tracker
Total Domestic Gross:
$257,730,019

Total International Gross:
$127,950,427

Total Worldwide Gross:
$385,680,446

For Your ConsiderationEdit

STAR TREK

The categories and potential recipients which Paramount Pictures has placed up for consideration by the various awards organizations.


Best Picture
Produced by J.J. AbramsDamon Lindelof


Best Director
J.J. Abrams


Best Actor
Chris Pine


Best Supporting Actor
Eric Bana
John Cho
Ben Cross
Bruce Greenwood
Leonard Nimoy
Simon Pegg
Zachary Quinto
Karl Urban
Anton Yelchin


Best Supporting Actress
Winona Ryder
Zoe Saldana


Best Adapted Screenplay
Written by Roberto Orci & Alex Kurtzman
Based Upon "Star Trek" Created by Gene Roddenberry


Best Visual Effects
Visual Effects Supervisor: Roger Guyett
Special Effects Supervisor: Burt Dalton
ILM Visual Effects Supervisor: Russell Earl
ILM Animation Supervisor: Paul Kavanagh


Best Film Editing
Mary Jo Markey, A.C.E. • Maryann Brandon, A.C.E.


Best Cinematography
Dan Mindel, ASC


Best Makeup
Makeup Department Head: Mindy Hall
Key Makeup Artist: Debra S. Coleman
Vulcans and Romulans Created by: Joel Harlow
Aliens Designed and Created by: Barney Burman
Hair Department Head: Terrell Baliel
Key Hairstylist: Lana Heying


Best Art Direction
Production Designer: Scott Chambliss
Set Decorator: Karen Manthey


Best Costume Design
Michael Kaplan


Best Original Score
Music by Michael Giacchino


Best Sound Mixing
Sound Mixer: Peter J. Devlin
Re-Recording Mixers: Paul MasseyAnna BehlmerAndy NelsonDavid Giammarco


Best Sound Editing
Supervising Sound Editors: Mark StoeckingerAlan Rankin, M.P.S.E.

Special Sound Effects and Montage: Ben Burtt

Bragging rightsEdit

From TrekMovie.com comments section for news story dated 27 July 2007 (see post #104):

As long as we're throwing names out there... how about Chris Pine? He's 27 and I think he has the acting chops needed for such a pivotal role. He doesn't look an awful lot like Kirk, but a little makeup and a proper performance should fix that. He also hasn't really had a breakthrough role yet. You can see him in such films as Princess Diaries 2, Just My Luck, and the awesome Smokin' Aces, where he plays the lead Tremor brother.

Three months later, Pine was cast as Kirk. Ooh-rah! Can I pick 'em or what?

In Memoriam 2008Edit

Commemorating those we lost in 2008 who helped build the Star Trek universe.


Name Description Birth Death
Viola Stimpson Actress who played the tour lady in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home 10-25-1906 01-14-2008
Herb Kenwith Director of TOS: "The Lights of Zetar" 07-14-1917 01-30-2008
Maggie Ostroff Assistant sound editor on Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country 01-17-1935 02-04-2008
John Alvin Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country poster artist 11-24-1948 02-06-2008
Robert DoQui Actor who played Noggra in DS9: "Sons of Mogh" 04-20-1934 02-09-2008
Steve Gerber Co-writer of TNG's "Contagion" 09-20-1947 02-10-2008
Perry Lopez Actor who played Esteban Rodriguez in TOS: "Shore Leave" 07-22-1929 02-14-2008
Gayne Rescher Cinematographer on Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan 12-19-1924 02-29-2008
Leonard Rosenman Composer for Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home 09-07-1924 03-04-2008
Michael Van Dyke Construction foreman for Star Trek Nemesis 01-14-1960 03-19-2008
Stanley Kamel Actor who played Kosinski in TNG: "Where No One Has Gone Before" 01-01-1943 04-08-2008
Alexander Courage Composer of TOS theme music and several TOS episodes; orchestrator on Star Trek: First Contact and Insurrection 12-10-1919 05-15-2008
Joseph Pevney Director of many TOS episodes 09-15-1911 05-18-2008
Robert Justman Associate producer/co-producer/assistant director on TOS and supervising producer on TNG 07-13-1926 05-28-2008
Bill Dial Writer for two episodes of DS9 and VOY: "Eye of the Needle" 06-17-1943 06-02-2008
Michael Rougas Actor who played Cleary in Star Trek: The Motion Picture 01-22-1931 06-19-2008
Lilyan Chauvin Actress who played Vedek Yassim in DS9: "Rocks and Shoals" 08-06-1925 06-26-2008
Paul Sorensen Actor who played the Merchantman captain in Star Trek III: The Search for Spock 02-16-1926 07-17-2008
Randy Pausch Inspirational professor who has a cameo in Star Trek 10-23-1960 07-25-2008
Jud Taylor Director of five TOS Season 3 episodes 02-25-1932 08-06-2008
Mel Harris Executive who launched Star Trek: The Next Generation 10-09-1942 09-06-1008
Joan Winston Star Trek convention pioneer 06-19-1931 09-11-2008
Oliver Crawford Writer for three episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series 08-12-1917 09-24-2008
Paul Schneider Writer of TOS: "Balance of Terror" and "The Squire of Gothos" 08-04-1923 10-13-2008
Yvette Blais (Ray Ellis) Co-composer for Star Trek: The Animated Series 07-28-1923 10-27-2008
Majel Barrett-Roddenberry The First Lady of Star Trek; played Christine Chapel, Lwaxana Troi, Number One, computer voice, etc. 02-23-1932 12-18-2008

Discrepancy ExplanationsEdit

Daniels2

Protecting History... One Change At a Time

Human-Klingon First ContactEdit

In Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, Spock says that, at that time (2293), the Klingons had been adversaries of the Federation (or at least Humans) for 70 years. In TNG's "First Contact" set in 2367, Capt. Jean-Luc Picard states that "centuries ago, disastrous contact with the Klingon Empire led to decades of war, and it was decided then that we would do surveillance before making [first] contact." Yet in the Star Trek: Enterprise pilot "Broken Bow", we see that First Contact was a full 142 years prior to Undiscovered Country. Also, many found that first contact hardly seemed to be the major disaster Picard said it was, nor would it have caused Starfleet to rethink its first contact protocols since it was a Klingon who first landed on Earth. In other words, many believe that first contact seems to have occurred differently than the way Picard said it did.

Picard also said the contact was "centuries" ago from 2367, meaning it had to happen at least two centuries prior. In this respect, the events seen in Enterprise remain true. But Spock stated conflicts began some 70 years before 2293, placing the beginning of the conflict at 2223. So there lies another contradiction.

I have a theory about all this, and I really don't think there's any contradiction at all. When Picard stated that "centuries ago, disastrous contact with the Klingon Empire led to decades of war," he meant that the numerous encounters between humans and the Federation - beginning in 2151 - ultimately led to the two powers becoming enemies in the 23rd century. In other words, after the less-than-successful First Contact seen in "Broken Bow" (unless a human farmer shooting a Klingon and then not permitting him to die a warrior's death is your idea of a successful first contact), humans and Klingons would have repeated encounters throughout the next several decades, sometimes resulting in embarrassment on the part of the Klingons. Around 2223, however, some major incident occurred and, having had enough of our meddling, the Klingons became our enemies and a tense cold war had begun between the two that would last for seventy years until the Khitomer Conference in The Undiscovered Country. To prevent similar incidents from occurring with other races, Starfleet decided to adopt a policy of covert surveillance. In other words, the surveillance policy wasn't the result of one initial encounter, but was rather the result of several failed encounters, ultimately leading to conflict in 2223. This explanation serves to confirm both Picard's and Spock's statements while also clearing Star Trek: Enterprise of any wrong-doing in this matter.

Now if only we could solve the whole cloaking technology problem...

Cloaking TechnologyEdit

Romulan bird-of-prey, ENT-aft, cloaking

And remember... you saw nothing!

In various episodes of Star Trek: Enterprise, Captain Jonathan Archer and his crew had repeated encounters with races capable of cloaking their vessels in 2151 and 2152. However, dialogue from the original series episode "Balance of Terror", set 115 years later, seems to imply that cloaking technology was a new concept at that point, never before encountered by Starfleet. Well, allow me to quell that myth for you.

If memory serves me correctly, there was never any point in "Balance of Terror" that specifially said it was the first time that cloaking technology had been encountered. In that episode, Spock told Captain Kirk that "invisibility is theoretically possible, Captain -- selectively bending light. But the power cost is enormous. They may have solved that." Look at that line: "the power cost IS enormous." He stated it matter-of-factly, which means that Starfleet probably encountered it or even tested with the technology prior to 2266, in which the episode is set.

Also, remember that the cloaking technology which the likes of the Suliban and the Romulans had back in the 22nd century were likely given to them by agents from the future who were involved in the Temporal Cold War. When the war's excursions into the 22nd century came to an end in 2154, all the technology that had been given out to those races were likely extracted and databases containing any blueprints or what not were wiped clean. Starfleet most likely realized this since, after further encounters with the Romulans and possibly the Suliban, they saw that ships of their time didn't have cloaking devices following the war's "end." So, Spock's surprise in "Balance of Terror" basically indicates that no ship has ever successfully operated a cloaking device without the assistance of future technology, because "the power cost is enormous." And, as the crew soon learned, the Romulans had, indeed, solved that problem.

Also, don't forget that the NX-01 managed to acquire a method to see through the cloaks of both the Suliban ships and the Romulan mines. Although the ship could not initially see through the cloak of the Romulan Bird-of-Prey encountered in "Minefield", it is possible they managed to find a way to see through cloaked Romulan ships and thereby render their cloaks useless. This ability may have been implemented into the sensors of all future starships, which would explain Kirk and Spock's surprise at seeing a Romulan ship disappearing since their sensors should have seen through the cloak. Keep in mind, too, that the Suliban did not cloak their ships by using an invisibility screen that selectively bends light, but was rather generated by some form of particle radiation. The Romulan mines also appeared to use this method (as evidenced by the NX-01's ability to use the quantum beacon to detect them), so it's likely the Romulan ships of this time also used this method and their cloak was also penetrated. But the Bird-of-Prey encountered by Kirk's ship utilized a screen capable of selectively bending light rather than the use of particle radiation. This explains why Kirk's Enterprise was not able to detect the ship visually.

There is also the possibility that the "cloak" seen in "Minefield" was later revealed (or at least thought) NOT to be a cloak, but some other technology. For example, it was hinted in the episodes of the Babel Crisis that the Romulan ships encountered in the Romulan minefield were utilizing a form of holographic technology to render themselves invisible. Another possibility is that the Romulan ships employed some form of transporter technology to appear and disappear over a short distance. So, yeah, either one of these is possible, and it would also explain why the Enterprise could detect the cloaked Romulan mines but not the ships. So, there ya go.

Which brings us to our next problem: how the hell did the Xyrillians get their hands on this techonlogy? Well, considering that they had holographic technology as well, I think it's safe to say that it developed naturally (in which case, Spock would have been talking about the energy cost for a Romulan ship being enormous) or that it was also some form of holographic technology.

More speculation: Romulans developed cloaking technology as early as the mid-22nd century; however, their earliest cloaks were far too crude to be used aboard starships. Instead, cloaking was limited to smaller objects such as mines and missiles. After repeated failures in advancing pure invisibility cloaks, they began experimenting with holography, with minimal success. They were able to utilize holographic masking technology aboard their spacecraft, but only on sub-light patrol ships with limited functions. It was this type of ship the Enterprise encountered in 2152. The mines and the patrol ships had different types of cloaking systems: one was particle-based, the other was holographic. By the 23rd century the Romulans had either perfected or advanced the particle-based cloak for use on their ships or had discovered another form of cloaking technology which had not yet been encountered by Starfleet. Hey, it's possible. Okay, moving on.

Molly O'Brien's AgeEdit

Molly O'Brien

What's my age again?

Molly O'Brien was born in the TNG episode "Disaster", set in 2368. Yet when the character was seen the following year on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, she had already aged 3 years, and throughout the show, she remained two years older than she should have been. My only explanation for this is that Molly, along with her parents, Miles O'Brien and Keiko O'Brien, were trapped in some temporal phenomenon similar to the Nexus sometime between Molly's birth in 2368 and the family's moving to Deep Space 9 in 2369. The O'Briens remained in this "temporal nexus" for nearly two years, while time outside the nexus never changed. When they returned after what they perceived to have been two years later, they found that they had barely been gone a few seconds, or perhaps they simply returned to the point in time they vanished from; either way, the O'Briens had perceived two years to have gone by while everyone else perceived it to be a few seconds. Note that this is somewhat similar to the experience Molly went through by herself in 2374, in the episode "Time's Orphan", only the age difference the first time was permanent, and her parents wouldn't have thought of this particular incident since they were with her the first time and were able to care for her and watch her grow. This is the only plausible explanation that I can come up with, and it makes sense to me, so it's all good.

Note that this all would have happened sometime between the episodes "Power Play" and "Rascals", when Molly went from being a baby to being about three-years old. Oh, and it all happened off-screen, obviously. This means Worf, who delivered Molly, would not have had to be with the O'Briens in whatever time distortion they may have been in. So, like... there.

More speculation: Another possible explanation is that Molly and her parents were involved in some warp-related incident which causes them all to age a few years. Maybe they were taking a family trip aboard a shuttlecraft and hit a spatial anomaly which distorted the warp field, temporarily trapping them within some kind of relativistic time bubble. Or something like that.

Scotty's Memory ProblemEdit

Montgomery Scott, Generations

Who the hell are ya callin' "senile?"

In the latter part of 2293, Montgomery Scott ("Scotty") witnessed the apparent death of James T. Kirk during the maiden voyage of the USS Enterprise-B. 76 years later, Scotty would be rescued by the crew of the USS Enterprise-D after being suspended in a transporter beam for 75 years. Upon his rescue and hearing that it was the Enterprise that rescued him, Scotty stated "I bet Jim Kirk himself pulled the old gal (the Enterprise-A) outta mothballs to come lookin' for me." Now, there are two apparent inconsistencies here. One is: why would Scotty think Kirk was looking for him if he believed Kirk had died aboard the Enterprise-B? The other is: why would he think the Enterprise-A would be put back into service to look for him when the newer Enterprise-B had already been launched? Well, I'm here to tell you why...

Scotty didn't believe Kirk was dead. Not for long, anyway.

Prior to Kirk's disappearance, Scotty had assisted in the rescue of several El-Aurian refugees from the clutches of the Nexus. As he was attempting to transport the El-Aurians, he noticed that their bio-signs were phasing in and out of the space-time continuum. After the El-Aurian survivors were beamed aboard, Kirk left to the ship's deflector room to make modifications which would allow the Enterprise to escape. He succeeded, but before the ship escaped, a burst of energy from the Nexus struck the ship in the area where Kirk was working. When Scotty and Captain John Harriman arrived to the destroyed deflector room, they were horrified at the sight... and saddened at the loss of Kirk. Scotty apparently believed that Kirk did not survive.

However, Kirk's body was never found, since he was swept into the Nexus. Many likely believed that he had been vaporized. But Scotty soon remembered that the El-Aurians were phasing in and out of the space-time continuum... what if the same happened to Kirk? Hearing of the euphoric experiences some of the El-Aurians had while engulfed in the Nexus, Scotty came to the conclusion that Kirk may still be alive. And up until his retirement (and possibly even after), he spent his time trying to find ways to bring Kirk back from the Nexus. Unfortunately, the energy ribbon soon left the galaxy. But he no doubt made his beliefs known to others, and thought others would do whatever was possible to bring Kirk back. This was his state-of-mind when he himself was deemed lost aboard the USS Jenolan, when he suspended himself in a transporter beam. When he was revived and heard the Enterprise had rescued him, he wondered whether Kirk himself had been rescued and had come looking for him.

Now, why would Scotty believe Kirk would have to take the Enterprise-A out of mothballs to come looking for him when the Enterprise-B was already launched? Well, Scotty likely figured that would be the course of action Kirk would have taken; even with the Enterprise-B in service, Kirk would have requested his old ship to conduct his own rescue mission. And it's very unlikely Starfleet would have denied him, especially since it wouldn't have required reassigning a commissioned ship for a potentially futile search, especially if they had already conducted their own search. Another possibility is that the unforeseen circumstances may have caused the Enterprise-B (and possibly all Excelsior class vessels) to be temporarily decommissioned prior to Scotty's disappearance. There are several other possibilities as to why Scotty believed his old Enterprise would have been the rescue ship -- you just have to think about it.

Another possible (and very likely) explanation by Nitpicker's Guide writer Phil Ferrand was related to me by MA user T smitts. See my talk page to read it for yourself.

Romulan ForeheadsEdit

Valdore (Admiral)

It's a Romulan thing, you wouldn't understand...

Star Trek: Enterprise managed to explain the physical differences between the Klingons seen on the original series and those seen afterwards with the creation of the Klingon augment virus in the episodes "Affliction" and "Divergence". At the same time, however, Enterprise managed to create another mystery regarding an alien race's physical features when they chose to give the Romulans of the 22nd century the forehead ridges which were present on Romulans in the 24th century, but not in the 23rd. Before assuming there must have also been a "Romulan augment virus," give me the chance to try and clear up this apparent discrepancy.

The most likely explanation is one that was hinted to at the end of the episode "Kir'Shara", in which it was revealed that V'Las was under the thumb of the Romulan Star Empire. V'Las was working with the Romulans in an early attempt to reunify the Vulcan and Romulan people. As we know, however, such attempts had not succeeded by the 24th century, when Spock was striving for the same goal using more noble methods. It is my belief that Vulcans like V'Las who wished for reunification between the two cultures ultimately left the Vulcan homeworld to join with the Romulan Empire, and it was their descendants whom Kirk would encounter in the form of the Romulan commanders in "Balance of Terror" and "The Enterprise Incident". Basically, the smooth-headed Romulans encountered during Kirk's era were not from the group who separated from the Vulcans some 2,000 years prior but were actually from a group who deserted Vulcan teachings in the 2150s, possibly due to the drastic social and religious changes as a result of the discovery of the Kir'Shara. Over the next century, these separatist Vulcans would serve the Romulan Empire. This serves to explain why the two Romulan commanders and the centurion seen on TOS lacked the bumpy foreheads that were present on the Romulans during the 22nd and 24th centuries.

The First Starship Enterprise?Edit

Many believe that the existence of the NX-01 Enterprise contradicts canon because the NCC-1701 was named the first Starship Enterprise. There is no contradiction, however, since the NX-01 was never officially designated a starship. Although many referred to it as such, you can see on the ship's dedication plaque that it's official designation is "spacecraft", not "starship". Therefore, even with the existence of the NX-01, the NCC-1701 is still the first official Starship to bear the name Enterprise. In addition, keep in mind that the NCC-1701 was the first Starship to bear the name USS Enterprise. The NX-01 did not have the USS designation.

My Take on Star Trek: EnterpriseEdit

Call me crazy, but I loved Enterprise. Yes, the writers and producers did make a few mistakes. Yes, some episodes were pretty poorly done. But every television series has their dull moments and their less-than-prideful moments. (Anybody remember "Spock's Brain"? How about "Profit and Lace"?) That doesn't mean the series, as a whole, was bad. Quite possibly the hardest type of show to write for is a franchise show with an already-established fanbase, such as Star Trek. After eighteen straight years of new episodes, it becomes more and more difficult to write material which the viewers have not only never seen before, but which they will also find engaging. This was the problem the writers faced when they created Enterprise. By taking us backwards in time before the days of Picard and Kirk, they found themselves walking a tight rope in which one wrong step would end everything. On the one hand, they had to maintain familiarity with the fans while also maintaining consistency with some 500 episodes of continuity and, more importantly, the optimistic vision set forth by Gene Roddenberry. On the other hand, they also had to create a show that was fresh and original and would invite old as well as new viewers to watch. If they failed in any one of those goals, it would cost them - and, as we all know, it did. But while Enterprise was far from a perfect show, it was also far from a terrible one. The series still offered some of the best hours of television Trek has ever seen, including "Broken Bow", "The Andorian Incident", "Shuttlepod One", "Shockwave", "Minefield", "Dead Stop", "Cease Fire", "Cogenitor", "Regeneration", "The Expanse", "Twilight", "Similitude", "Proving Ground", "Azati Prime", "The Council", "Zero Hour", "Borderland", "Cold Station 12", "The Augments", "The Forge", "Awakening", "Kir'Shara", "Babel One", "United", "The Aenar" and, of course, "In a Mirror, Darkly". It's funny how most people prefer to remember all the "mistakes" the show made and forget the good shows they had. (For the record, the only really bad shows created that you might want to stay away from are "Terra Nova", "Oasis", "A Night in Sickbay", "Marauders", "Vanishing Point", "Precious Cargo", "Horizon", "Extinction", "Exile", and "". "Two Days and Two Nights" also wasn't very good, but John Billingsley's hilarious performance and the continuation of events from "Detained" helped to save it a bit. I also wasn't a fan of "Acquisition" at first, but it's kinda grown on me since then.)

Oh, and for all those people who keep saying Berman & Braga screwed with the timeline and created many inconsistencies... first of all, it's only a damn TV show. Secondly, instead of whining and complaining about how the timeline has been ruined, how about trying to think up ways to explain these apparent inconsistencies? And lastly, why the hell are you treating Enterprise as if it's the only Trek series to contradict other shows? Every Trek series and film contradicts something from another Trek series or film. Yet Enterprise is suddenly the guilty party? I don't think so. As I said, if there is a contradiction, try coming up with a possible explanation for it, as I have done for some cases on my subpage, rather than b**ching about it.

As for the series finale, "These Are the Voyages..." yes, I was a bit disappointed, particularly with Tucker's death and the lack of characterization. But I still believe it was a good episode overall. In fact, it kinda grows on you after repeated viewings.

Anyways, I currently have Season 5 all planned out in my head. Sadly, we will most likely never see it happen.

Oscar-worthy TrekkersEdit

The following is a list of Star Trek alumni who have won or who have been nominated for one or more Academy Awards, regardless of whether they were for Trek films not.

1992 Nominee - Batman Returns (shared with John Bruno, Mike Fink and Dennis Skotak)
2001 Nominee - Pearl Harbor (shared with Eric Brevig, John Frazier, and Edward Hirsh)
2002 Nominee -
Name Category Year Film Result
F. Murray Abraham Best Actor in a Leading Role 1984 Amadeus Won
Jim Alexander Best Sound 1980 Coal Miner's Daughter Nominated (shared with Roger Heman, Jr.
and Richard Portman)
1983 Terms of Endearment Nominated (shared with Rick Kline,
Donald O. Mitchell and Kevin O'Connell)
Gary Alexander Best Sound 1985 Out of Africa Won (shared with Peter Handford,
Chris Jenkins, and Larry Stensvold)
John A. Alonzo Best Cinematography 1974 Chinatown Nominated
Judith Anderson Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1940 Rebecca Nominated
Richard L. Anderson Special Achievement Award
For sound effects editing
1981 Raiders of the Lost Ark Received (shared with Ben Burtt)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1982 Poltergeist Nominated
(shared with Stephen Hunter Flick)
1996 Daylight Nominated
(shared with David A. Whittaker)
Bud Asman Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1996 Eraser Nominated
(shared with Alan Robert Murray)
Best Sound Editing 2000 Space Cowboys
Best Achievement in Sound Editing 2006 Flags of Our Fathers
Letters from Iwo Jima Won (shared with Alan Robert Murray)
Franz Bachelin Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color 1959 Journey to the Center of the Earth Nominated
(shared with Herman A. Blumenthal,
Joseph Kish, Walter M. Scott,
and Lyle R. Wheeler)
Robert Badami Technical Achievement Award
For the design and development of the Streamline Scoring System,
Mark IV, for motion picture music editing
1989 N/A Received (shared with Bill and Dick Bernstein)
Stuart Baird Best Film Editing 1978 Superman Nominated
1988 Gorillas in the Mist: The Story of Dian Fossey
Craig Barron Best Effects, Visual Effects 1992 Batman Returns (shared with John Bruno,
Mike Fink, and Dennis Skotak)
Best Achievement in Visual Effects 2008 The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Won (shared with Eric Barba,
Burt Dalton, and Steve Preeg)
Jack Bear Best Costume Design 1970 Darling Lili Nominated (shared with Donald Brooks)
Peter E. Berger Best Film Editing 1987 Fatal Attraction Nominated (shared with Michael Kahn)
John Bettis Best Music, Original Song 1990 The Godfather: Part III
Song: "Promise Me You'll Remember"
Nominated (shared with Carmine Coppola)
Theodore Bikel Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1958 The Defiant One Nominated
Bari Burman Best Makeup 1988 Scrooged Nominated
Thomas R. Burman
Ben Burtt Special Achievement Award
For sound effects editing
1977 Star Wars Received
1981 Raiders of the Lost Ark Received (shared with
Richard L. Anderson)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1982 E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial Won (shared with Charles L. Campbell)
1983 Star Wars: Episode IV - Return of the Jedi Nominated
Best Sound Nominated (shared with Tony Daw,
Gary Summers, and Randy Thom)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1988 Willow Nominated (shared with Richard Hymns)
1989 Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade Won (shared with Richard Hymns)
Best Sound Nominated (shared Tony Dawe,
Shawn Murphy, and Gary Summers)
Best Documentary, Short Subjects 1996 Special Effects: Anything Can Happen Nominated (shared with Susanne Simpson)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1999 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace Nominated (shared with Tom Bellfort)
Best Achievement in Sound 2008 WALL·E Nominated (shared with Tom Myers
and Michael Semanick)
Best Achievement in Sound Nominated (shared with Matthew Wood)
Greg Cannom Best Makeup 1991 Hook Nominated (shared with Christina Smith
and Monty Westmore)
1992 Bram Stoker's Dracula Won (shared with Michele Burke
and Matthew W. Mungle)
Hoffa Nominated (shared with John Blake
and Ve Neill)
1993 Mrs. Doubtfire Won (shared with Ve Neill
and Yolanda Toussieng)
1995 Roommates Nominated (shared with Colleen Callaghan
and Robert Laden)
1997 Titanic Nominated (shared with Tina Earnshaw
and Simon Thompson)
1999 Bicentennial Man Nominated
2001 A Beautiful Mind Nominated
(shared with Colleen Callaghan)
Best Achievement in Makeup 2008 The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Won
Gene S. Cantamessa Best Sound 1972 The Candidate Nominated (shared with Richard Portman)
1974 Young Frankenstein
1977 Close Encounters of the Third Kind Nominated (shared with Robert Glass,
Robert Knudson, and Don MacDougall)
1979 1941
1982 E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial Won (shared with Don Digirolamo,
Robert Glass, and Robert Knudson)
1984 2010 Nominated (shared with Carlos DeLarios,
Michael J. Kohut, and Aaron Rochin)
1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Nominated (shared with David J. Hudson,
Mel Metcalfe, and Terry Porter)
Steve Cantamessa Best Achievement in Sound Mixing 2004 Ray Won (shared with Bob Beemer,
Greg Orloff, and Scott Millan)
Robert Carmichael Best Short Film, Live Action 1980 Fall Line Nominated (shared with Greg Lowe)
Keith Carradine Best Music, Original Song 1975 Nashville
Song: "I'm Easy"
Won
Seymour Cassel Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1968 Faces Nominated
Ed Catmull Scientific and Engineering Award
For development of "RenderMan" software
providing the means to digitally create scenes or elements
that may be composited with other footage.
1993 N/A Received (shared with Anthony A. Apodaca, Loren Carpenter,
Rob Cook, Pat Hanrahan, Darwyn Peachey,
and Thomas Porter)
Scientific and Engineering Award
For pioneering inventions in digital image compositing.

1996

Received (shared with Tom Duff,
Thomas Porter, and Alvy Ray Smith)
Academy Award of Merit
For significant advancements to the field of motion picture rendering
as exemplified in Pixar's "Renderman."
2001 Received (shared with Loren Carpenter
and Ron Cook)
Technical Achievement Award
For the original concept of subdivision surfaces
as a modeling technique in motion picture production.
2006 Received (shared with Tony DeRose
and Jos Stam)
Gordon E. Swayer Award 2009 Received
Thomas Causey Best Sound 1990 Dick Tracy Nominated (shared with David E. Campbell,
Doug Hemphill, and Chris Jenkins)
George Coe Best Short Film, Live Action Subjects 1968 De Düva: The Dove Nominated (shared with Sidney Davis
and Anthony Lover)
Jack T. Collis Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1976 The Last Tycoon Nominated (shared with Gene Callahan
and Jerry Wunderlich)
James Cromwell Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1995 Babe Nominated
Nathan Crowley Best Achievement in Art Direction 2006 The Prestige Nominated (shared with Julie Ochipinti)
2008 The Dark Knight Nominated (shared with Peter Lando)
Burt Dalton Best Achievement in Visual Effects 2008 The Curious Case of Benjamin Button Won (shared with Eric Barba,
Craig Barron, and Steve Preeg)
Bruce Davison Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1990 Longtime Companion Nominated
Jeff Dawn Best Makeup 1991 Terminator 2: Judgment Day Won (shared with Stan Winston)
John Debney Best Achievement in Music
Written for Motion Pictures,
Original Score
2004 The Passion of the Christ Nominated
Linda DeScenna Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with Leon Harris,
Joe Jennings, Harold Michelson,
and John Vallone)
1982 Blade Runner Nominated (shared with Lawrence G. Paull
and David Snyder)
1985 The Color Purple Nominated (shared with J. Michael Riva
and Robert W. Welch)
1988 Rain Man Nominated (shared with Ida Random)
1992 Toys Nominated (shared with Ferdinando Scarfiotti)
Peter J. Devlin Best Sound 2001 Pearl Harbor Nominated (shared with Kevin O'Connell
and Greg P. Russell)
Best Achievement in Sound 2007 Transformers
Brad Dourif Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1975 One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Nominated
Doug Drexler Best Makeup 1990 Dick Tracy Won (shared with John Caglione, Jr.)
George Duning Best Music, Scoring of a
Musical Picture
1949 Jolson Sings Again Nominated (shared with Morris Stoloff)
Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic
or Comedy Picture
1950 No Sad Songs for Me Nominated
1953 From Here to Eternity Nominated (shared with Morris Stoloff)
1955 Picnic Nominated
Best Music, Scoring of
a Musical Picture
1956 The Eddy Duchin Story Nominated (shared with Morris Stoloff)
Michael Dunn Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1965 Ship of Fools Nominated
John M. Dwyer Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1980 Coal Miner's Daughter Nominated (shared with John W. Corso)
Samantha Eggar Best Actress in a Leading Role 1965 The Collector Nominated
Zoltan Elek Best Makeup 1985 Mask Won (shared with Michael Westmore)
Mike Elizalde Best Achievement in Makeup 2008 Hellboy II: The Golden Army Nominated (shared with Thomas Floutz)
Robert Elswit Best Achievement in Cinematography 2005 Good Night, and Good Luck. Nominated
2007 There Will Be Blood Won
Jerry Fielding Best Music, Original Score
for a Motion Picture (not a Musical)
1969 The Wild Bunch Nominated
Best Music, Original Dramatic Score 1974 Straw Dogs
Best Music, Original Score 1976 The Outlaw Josey Wales
Louise Fletcher Best Actress in a Leading Role 1975 One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Won
Stephen Hunter Flick Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1982 Poltergeist Nominated
(shared with Richard L. Anderson)
Special Achievement Award
For sound effects editing
1987 RoboCop Received (shared with John Pospisil)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1988 Die Hard Nominated (shared with Richard Shorr)
1990 Total Recall Nominated
1994 Speed Won
Edward French Best Makeup 1991 Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Nominated (shared with Michael Mills
and Richard Snell)
Gerald Fried Best Music, Original Score 1974 Birds Do It, Bees Do It Nominated
Jake Garber Best Makeup 1996 Star Trek: First Contact Nominated (shared with Michael Westmore
and Scott Wheeler)
Teri Garr Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1982 Tootsie Nominated
Michael Giacchino Best Achievement in Music Written for
Motion Pictures, Original Score
2007 Ratatouille Nominated
Whoopi Goldberg Best Actress in a Leading Role 1985 The Color Purple Nominated
Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1990 Ghost Won
Jerry Goldsmith Best Music, Score -
Substantially Original
1962 Freud Nominated
1965 A Patch of Blue
Best Music, Original Music Score 1967 The Sand Pebbles
Best Music, Original Score
for a Motion Picture (not a Musical)
1968 Planet of the Apes
Best Music, Original Score 1970 Patton
Best Music, Original Dramatic Score 1973 Papillon
1974 Chinatown
Best Music, Original Score 1975 The Wind and the Lion
1976 The Omen Won
Best Music, Original Song The Omen
Song: "Ave Satani"
Nominated
Best Music, Original Score 1978 The Boys from Brazil
1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture
1982 Poltergeist
1983 Under Fire
1986 Hoosiers
1992 Basic Instinct
Best Music, Original Dramatic Score 1997 L.A. Confidential
Best Music, Original Musical
or Comedy Score
1998 Mulan Nominated (shared with Matthew Wilder
and David Zippel)
Mike Gray Best Writing, Screenplay Written
Directly for the Screen
1979 The China Syndrome Nominated (shared with James Bridges
and T.S. Cook)
Joel Grey Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1972 Cabaret Won
Jeffrey J. Haboush Best Achievement in Sound Mixing 2004 Spider-Man 2 Nominated (shared with Joseph Geisinger,
Kevin O'Connell, and Greg P. Russell)
Cecelia Hall Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1986 Top Gun Nominated
(shared with George Watters II)
1990 The Hunt for Red October Won (shared with George Watters II)
Ernest Haller Best Cinemtography 1938 Jezebel Nominated
Best Cinematography, Color 1939 Gone With the Wind Won (shared with Ray Rennahan)
Best Cinematography,
Black-and-White
1940 All This, and Heaven Too Nominated
1945 Mildred Place
Best Cinematography, Color 1950 The Flame and the Arrow
Best Cinematography,
Black-and-White
1962 What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
1963 Lillies of the Field
Kevin Haney Best Makeup 1989 Driving Miss Daisy Won (shared with Lynn Barber
and Manlio Roccheti)
Larry Hankin Best Short Film, Live Action 1979 Solly's Diner Nominated (shared with Harry Mathias
and Jay Zuckerman)
Leon Harris Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with Linda DeScenna,
Joe Jennings, Harold Michelson,
and John Vallone)
Jack Hayes Best Music, Scoring of Music,
Adaptation or Treatment
1964 The Unsinkable Molly Brown Nominated (shared with Robert Armbruster,
Léo Arnaud, Jack Elliott, Calvin Jackson,
and Leo Shuken)
Best Music, Original Score 1985 The Color Purple Nominated (shared with Chris Boardman,
Jorge Calandrelli, Andraé Crouch, Jerry Hey,
Quincy Jones, Randy Kerber,
Jeremy Lubbock, Joel Rosenbaum,
Caiphus Semenya, Fred Steiner,
and Rod Temperton)
Doug Hemphill Best Sound 1990 Dick Tracy Nominated (shared with David E. Campbell,
Thomas Causey and Chris Jenkins)
1992 The Last of the Mohicans Won (shared with Chris Jenkins,
Simon Kaye and Mark Smith)
1993 Geronimo: An American Legend Nominated (shared with Bill W. Benton,
Chris Carpenter, and Lee Orloff)
1997 Air Force One Nominated (shared with Rick Kline,
Paul Massey and Keith A. Wester)
1999 The Insider Nominated (shared with Andy Nelson
and Lee Orloff)
Best Sound Mixing 2003 Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World Nominated (shared with Paul Massey
and Art Rochester)
Best Achievement in Sound Mixing 2005 Walk the Line Nominated (shared with Peter F. Kurland
and Paul Massey)
Edouard F. Henriques Best Makeup 2000 The Cell Nominated (shared with Michele Burke)
2003 Master and Commander: The Far Side
of the World
Nominated
(shared with Yolanda Toussieng)
Michael Herbick Best Sound 1993 The Fugitive Nominated (shared with Donald O. Mitchell,
Frank Montano, and Scott D. Smith)
1994 Clear and Present Danger Nominated (shared with Donald O. Mitchell,
Frank Montano, and Art Rochester)
The Shawshank Redemption Nominated (shared with Willie D. Burton,
Robert J. Litt, and Elliot Tyson)
1995 Batman Forever Nominated (shared with Petur Hliddal,
Donald O. Mitchell, and Frank Montano)
1999 The Green Mile Nominated (shared with Willie D. Burton,
Robert J. Litt, and Elliot Tyson)
James Horner Best Music, Original Score 1986 Aliens Nominated
Best Music, Original Song An American Tail
Song: "Somewhere Out There"
Nominated (shared with Barry Mann
and Cynthia Weil)
Best Music, Original Score 1989 Field of Dreams Nominated
Best Music, Original Dramatic Score 1995 Apollo 13
Braveheart
1997 Titanic Won
Best Music, Original Song Titanic
Song: "My Heart Will Go On"
Won (shared with Will Jennings)
Best Music, Original Score 2001 A Beautiful Mind Nominated
2003 House of Sand and Fog
David J. Hudson Best Sound 1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Nominated
(shared with Gene S. Cantamessa, Mel Metcalfe,
and Terry Porter)
1991 Beauty and the Beast Nominated (shared with Doc Kane,
Mel Metcalfe and Terry Porter)
1992 Aladdin
Len Janson Best Short Film, Live Action Subjects 1967 Stop Look and Listen Nominated (shared with Chuck Menville)
Chris Jenkins Best Sound 1985 Out of Africa Won (shared with Gary Alexander,
Peter Handford, and Larry Stensvold)
1991 Dick Tracy Nominated (shared with David E. Campbell,
Thomas Causey, and Doug Hemphill)
1992 The Last of the Mohicans Won (shared with Doug Hemphill,
Simon Kaye and Mark Smith)
Best Achievement in Sound 2008 Wanted (shared with Petr Forejt
and Frank Montano)
Joe Jennings Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with Linda DeScenna,
Leon Harris, Harold Michelson,
and John Vallone)
Jon Johnson Best Sound Editing 2000 U-571 Won
Frank P. Keller Best Film Editing 1967 Beach Red Nominated
1968 Bullitt Won
1972 The Hot Rock Nominated (shared with Fred W. Berger)
1973 Jonathan Livingston Seagull Nominated (shared with James Galloway)
Sally Kellerman Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1970 MASH Nominated
Richard H. Kline Best Cinematography 1967 Camelot Nominated
1976 King Kong
Frank Langella Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role 2008 Frost/Nixon Nominated
Steve LaPorte Best Makeup 1988 Beetle Juice Won (shared with Ve Neill
and Robert Short)
Robert Lewin Best Writing, Best Screenplay - Oscar 1956 The Bold and the Brave Nominated
Robert J. Litt Best Sound 1988 Mississippi Burning Nominated (shared with Rick Kling,
Danny Michael and Elliot Tyson)
1994 The Shawshank Redemption Nominated (shared with Willie D. Burton,
Michael Herbick, and Elliot Tyson)
1999 The Green Mile
John Logan Best Writing, Screenplay Written
Directly for the Screen
2000 Gladiator Nominated
Best Writing, Original Screenplay 2004 The Aviator
Virginia Madsen Best Actress in a Supporting Role 2004 Sideways Nominated
Mark A. Mangini Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Nominated
1992 Aladdin
1997 The Fifth Element
Don M. Mankiewicz Best Writing, Screenplay Based on
Material from Another Medium
1958 I Want to Live! Nominated (shared with Nelson Gidding)
Michael McCusker Best Achievement in Editing 2004 Walk the Line Nominated
Michael McKean Best Music, Original Song 2003 A Mighty Wind
Song: "A Kiss at the End of the Rainbow"
Nominated (shared with Annette O'Toole)
Chuck Menville Best Short Film, Live Action Subjects 1967 Stop Look and Listen Nominated (shared with Len Janson)
Mel Metcalfe Best Sound 1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Nominated
(shared with Gene S. Cantamessa, David J. Hudson,
and Terry Porter)
1991 Beauty and the Beast Nominated (shared with David J. Hudson,
Doc Kane and Terry Porter)
1992 Aladdin
Nicholas Meyer Best Writing, Screenplay Based on
Material from Another Medium
1976 The Seven-Per-Cent Solution Nominated
Mickey S. Michaels Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1970 Airport Nominated (shared with E. Preston Ames,
Alexander Golitzen, and Jack D. Moore)
1977 Airport '77 Nominated (shared with George C. Webb)
Harold Michelson Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with Linda DeScenna,
Leon Harris, Joe Jennings,
and John Vallone)
1983 Terms of Endearment Nominated (shared with Anthony Mondell,
Polly Plat, and Tom Pedigo)
F. Hudson Miller Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1991 Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Nominated
(shared with George Watters II)
Michael M. Mills Best Makeup 1991 Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Nominated (shared with Ed French
and Richard Snell)
Frank Montano Best Sound 1992 Under Siege Nominated (shared with Rick Hart,
Donald O. Mitchell and Scott D. Smith)
1993 The Fugitive Nominated (shared with Michael Herbick,
Donald O. Mitchell and Scott D. Smith)
1994 Clear and Present Danger Nominated (shared with Michael Herbick,
Donald O. Mitchell and Art Rochester)
1995 Batman Forever Nominated (shared with Michael Herbick,
Petur Hliddal and Donald O. Mitchell)
Best Achievement in Sound 2008 Wanted Nominated (shared with Petr Forjt
and Chris Jenkins)
Alan Robert Murray Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1985 Ladyhawke Nominated
(shared with Robert G. Henderson)
1989 Lethal Weapon 2
1996 Eraser Nominated (shared with Bud Asman)
Best Sound Editing 2000 Space Cowboys
Best Achievement in Sound Editing 2006 Flags of Our Fathers
Letters from Iwo Jima Won (shared with Bud Asman)
Ve Neill Best Makeup 1988 Beetle Juice Won (shared with Steve LaPorte
and Robert Short)
1990 Edward Scissorhands Nominated (shared with Stan Winston)
1992 Batman Returns Nominated (shared with Ronnie Specter
and Stan Winston)
Hoffa Nominated (shared with John Blake
and Greg Cannom)
1993 Mrs. Doubtfire Won (shared with Greg Cannom
and Yolanda Toussieng)
1994 Ed Wood Won (shared with Rick Baker
and Yolanda Toussieng)
2003 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of
the Black Pearl
Nominated (shared with Martin Samuel)
Best Achievement in Makeup 2007 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
Greg Nelson Best Makeup 1989 Dad Nominated (shared with Ken Diaz
and Dick Smith)
Tom Overton Best Sound 1976 A Star Is Born Nominated (shared with Robert Glass,
Richard Knudson, and Dan Wallin)
Steve Pederson Best Sound 1993 Schindler's List Nominated (shared with Ron Judkins,
Scott Millan and Any Nelson)
1995 Apollo 13 Won (shared with Rick Dior,
David MacMillan and Scott Millan)
Tom Pedigo Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1983 Terms of Endearment Nominated (shared with Harold Michelson,
Anthony Mondell, and Polly Plat)
Don Peterman Best Cinematography 1983 Flashdance Nominated
1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
Michael J. Pollard Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1967 Bonnie and Clyde Nominated
Terry Porter Best Sound 1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home Nominated (shared with
Gene S. Cantamessa, David J. Hudson
and Mel Metcalfe)
1991 Beauty and the Beast Nominated (shared with David J. Hudson,
Doc Kane and Mel Metcalfe
1992 Aladdin
Best Achievement in Sound Mixing 2005 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Nominated (shared with Tony Johnson
and Dean A. Zupancic)
William Reeves Best Short Film, Animated 1986 Luxo, Jr. Nominated (shared with John Lasseter)
1988 Tin Toy Won (shared with John Lasseter)
Scientific and Engineering Award
for the original concept and the development
of particle systems used to create
computer generated visual effects in motion pictures.
1996 N/A Received
Scientific and Engineering Award
for the development of the Marionette
Three-Dimensional Computer Animation
System.
1997 Received (shared with Tom Duff,
Sam Leffler, and Eben Ostby)
Bob Ringwood Best Costume Design 1987 Empire of the Sun Nominated
Best Achievement in Costume Design 2004 Troy
Sam Rolfe Best Writing, Story and Screenplay 1953 The Naked Spur Nominated
(shared with Harold Jack Bloom)
David M. Ronne Best Sound 1981 On Golden Pond Nominated (shared with Richard Portman)
1984 The River Nominated (shared with Nick Alphin,
Richard Portman, and Robert Thirlwell)
1985 Silverado Nominated (shared with Rick Kline,
Donald Mitchell, and Kevin O'Connell)
Leonard Rosenman Best Music, Scoring Original
Song Score and/or Adaptation
1975 Barry Lyndon Won
Best Music, Original Song Score
and Its Adaptation
or Best Adaptation Score
1976 Bound for Glory
Best Music, Original Score 1983 Cross Creek Nominated
1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home
Winona Ryder Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1993 The Age of Innocence Nominated
Best Actress in a Leading Role 1994 Little Women
Chris Sarandon Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1975 Dog Day Afternoon Nominated
Roy N. Sickner Best Writing, Story and Screenplay
Based on Material Not Previously
Published or Produced
1969 The Wild Bunch Nominated
(shared with Walon Green
and Sam Peckinpah)
Jean Simmons Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1948 Hamlet Nominated
Best Actress in a Leading Role 1969 The Happy Ending Nominated
Mark Smith Best Sound 1992 The Last of the Mohicans Won (shared with Doug Hemphill,
Chris Jenkins and Simon Kaye)
Mike Smithson Best Makeup 1999 Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me Nominated (shared with Michele Burke)
Richard Snell Best Makeup 1991 Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Nominated (shared with Ed French
and Michael Mills)
Ben Snow Best Effects, Visual Effects 1999 Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones Nominated (shared with Rob Coleman,
Pablo Helman, and John Knoll)
Best Visual Effects 2001 Pearl Harbor Nominated (shared with Eric Brevig,
John Frazier, and Edward Hirsh)
Best Achievement in Visual Effects 2008 Iron Man Nominated (shared with Shane Mahan,
John Nelson, and Daniel Sudick)
Fred Steiner Best Music, Original Score 1985 The Color Purple Nominated (shared with Chris Boardman,
Jorge Calandrelli, Andraé Crouch, Jack Hayes,
Jerry Hey, Quincy Jones, Randy Kerber,
Jeremy Lubbock, Joel Rosenbaum,
Caiphus Semenya, and Rod Temperton)
Dean Stockwell Best Actor in a Supporting Role 1988 Married to the Mob Nominated
Mark Stoeckinger Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1997 Face/Off Nominated (shared with Pat Hallberg)
David E. Stone Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1992 Bram Stoker's Dracula Won (shared with Tom C. McCarthy
Robert Swarthe Best Short Film, Animated 1975 Kick Me Nominated
Best Effects, Visual Effects 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with John Dykstra,
Grant McCune, Dave Stewart,
Douglas Trumball, and Richard Yuricich)
Randy Thom Best Sound 1983 Never Cry Wolf Nominated (shared with
Todd Boekelheide, David Parker,
and Alan R. Splet)
The Right Stuff Won (shared with Mark Berger,
David MacMillan, and Thomas Scott)
Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi Nominated (shared with Ben Burtt,
Tony Dawe, and Gary Summers)
1991 Backdraft Nominated (shared with Gary Rydstrom,
Gary Summers and Glenn Williams)
Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1994 Forrest Gump Nominated (shared with Gloria S. Borders)
Best Sound Nominated (shared with Tom Johnson,
William B. Kaplan and Dennis S. Sands)
Best Sound 1997 Contact
2000 Cast Away
Best Achievement in Sound Editing 2004 The Incredibles Nominated (shared with Michael Silvers)
The Polar Express Nominated (shared with Dennis Leonard)
Best Achievement in Sound Mixing The Incredibles Won (shared with Doc Kane and Gary Rizzo)
The Polar Express Nominated (shared with Tom Johnson,
William B. Kaplan and Dennis S. Sands)
Best Achievement in Sound Editing 2007 Ratatouille Nominated (shared with Michael Silvers)
Best Achievement in Sound Mixing Nominated (shared with Doc Kane
and Michael Semanick)
Yolanda Toussieng Best Makeup 1993 Mrs Doubtfire Won (shared with Greg Cannom
and Ve Neill)
1994 Ed Wood Won (shared with Rick Baker
and Ve Neill)
2003 Master and Commander: The Far Side
of the World
Nominated
(shared with Edouard F. Henriques)
John Vallone Best Art Direction-Set Decoration 1979 Star Trek: The Motion Picture Nominated (shared with Linda DeScenna,
Leon Harris, Joe Jennings,
and Harold Michelson)
Keith VanderLaan Best Achievement in Makeup 2004 The Passion of the Christ Nominated (shared with Christien Tinsley)
Diane Warren Best Music, Original Song 1987 Mannequin
Song: "Nothing's Gonna Stop Us Now"
Nominated
1996 Up Close & Personal
Song: "Because You Loved Me"
1997 Con Air
Song: "How Do I Live"
1998 Armageddon
Song: "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing"
1999 Music of the Heart
Song: "Music Of My Heart"
2001 Pearl Harbor
Song: "There You'll Be"
Dan Wallin Best Sound 1970 Woodstock Nominated (shared with L.A. Johnson)
1976 A Star Is Born Nominated (shared with Robert Glass,
Robert Knudson and Tom Overton)
George Watters II Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1986 Top Gun Nominated (shared with Cecilia Hall)
1990 The Hunt for Red October Won (shared with Cecilia Hall)
1991 Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country Nominated (shared with F. Hudson Miller)
1995 Crimson Tide Nominated
1998 Armageddon
Best Sound Editing 2001 Pearl Harbor Won (shared with Christopher Boyes)
2003 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of
the Black Pearl
Nominated (shared with Christopher Boyes)
Best Achievement in Sound Editing 2006 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
Peter Weller Best Short Film, Live Action 1993 Partners Nominated (shared with Jana Sue Memel)
Orson Welles Best Actor in a Leading Role 1941 Citizen Kane Nominated
Best Director
Best Picture
Best Writing, Original Screenplay Won (shared with Herman J. Mankiewicz)
Best Picture 1942 The Magnificent Ambersons Nominated
Honorary Award
for superlative artistry and versatility
in the creation of motion pictures.
1970 N/A Received
Michael Westmore Best Makeup 1984 2010: The Year We Make Contact Nominated
1985 Mask Won (shared with Zoltan Elek)
1986 The Clan of the Cave Bear Nominated (shared with Michele Burke)
1996 Star Trek: First Contact Nominated (shared with Jake Garber
and Scott Wheeler)
Monty Westmore Best Makeup 1991 Hook Nominated (shared with Greg Cannom
and Christina Smith)
Ray West Best Sound 1977 Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope Won (shared with Derek Ball,
Don MacDougall, and Bob Minkler)
Charles F. Wheeler Best Cinematography 1970 Tora! Tora! Tora! Nominated (shared by Osamu Furuya,
Sinsaku Himeda, and Masamichi Satoh)
Scott Wheeler Best Makeup 1996 Star Trek: First Contact Nominated (shared with Jake Garber
and Michael Westmore)
David A. Whittaker Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing 1996 Daylight Nominated
(shared with Richard L. Anderson)
Paul Williams Best Music, Original Song 1973 Cinderella Liberty
Song: "Nice to Be Around"
Nominated (shared with John Williams)
Best Music, Scoring Original
Song Score and/or Adaptation
1974 Phantom of the Paradise Nominated
(shared with George Aliceson Tipton)
Best Music, Original Song 1976 A Star Is Born
Song: "Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born)"
won (shared with Barbara Streissand)
Best Music, Original Song Score
and Its Adaptation or
Best Adaptation Score
Bugsy Malone Nominated
Best Music, Original Song 1979 The Muppet Movie
Song: "The Rainbow Connection"
Nominated (shared with Kenny Ascher)
Best Music, Original Song Score
and Its Adaptation or
Best Adaptation Score
The Muppet Movie
Paul Winfield Best Actor in a Leading Role 1972 Sounder Nominated
Robert Wise Best Film Editing 1941 Citizen Kane Nominated
Best Director 1958 I Want to Live!
1961 West Side Story Won (shared with Jerome Robbins)
Best Picture
Best Director 1965 The Sound of Music Won
Best Picture
Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award 1966 N/A Received
Best Picture The Sand Pebbles Nominated
Alfre Woodard Best Actress in a Supporting Role 1983 Cross Creek Nominated

Best Sound (Mixing)Edit

Greg P. Russell
1989 Nominee - Black Rain (shared with Donald O. Mitcell, Kevin O'Connell and Keith A. Wester)
1996 Nominee - The Rock (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Keith A. Wester)
1997 Nominee - Con Air (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Art Rochester)
1998 Nominee - The Mask of Zorro (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Pud Cusack) and Armageddon (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Keith A. Wester)
2000 Nominee - The Patriot (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Lee Orloff)
2001 Nominee - Pearl Harbor (shared with Peter J. Devlin and Kevin O'Connell)
2002 Nominee - Spider-Man (shared with Kevin O'Connell and Ed Novick)
2004 Nominee - Spider-Man 2 (shared with Joseph Geisinger, Jeffrey J. Haboush, and Kevin O'Connell)
2005 Nominee - Memoirs of a Geisha (shared with Rick Kline, Kevin O'Connell, and John Pritchett)
2006 Nominee - Apocalypto (shared with Fernando Camara and Kevin O'Connell)
2007 Nominee - Transformers (shared with Peter J. Devlin and Kevin O'Connell)
Elliot Tyson
1988 Nominee - Mississippi Burning (shared with Rick Kline, Robert J. Litt, and Danny Michael)
1989 Winner - Glory (shared with Donald O. Mitchell, Gregg Rudloff, and Russell Williams II)
1994 Nominee - The Shawshank Redemption (shared with Willie D. Burton, Michael Herbick, and Robert J. Litt)
1999 Nominee - The Green Mile (shared with Willie D. Burton, Michael Herbick, and Robert J. Litt)
Dan Wallin
1970 Nominee - Woodstock (shared with L.A. Johnson)
1976 Nominee - A Star Is Born (shared with Robert Glass, Richard Knudson, and Tom Overton

Best Visual EffectsEdit

Scott E. Anderson
1995 Winner - Babe (shared with John Cox, Charles Gibson, and Neal Scanlan)
1997 Nominee - Starship Troopers (shared with Alec Gillis, John Richardson, and Phil Tippett)
2000 Nominee - Hollow Man (shared with Craig Hayes, Stan Parks, and Scott Stokdyk)
Gordon Baker and Pete Kozachik
1993 Nominees - The Nightmare Before Christmas (shared with Eric Leighton and Ariel Velasco-Shaw)
John Bell and Steve Gawley
1989 Nominee - Back to the Future Part II (shared with Michael Lantieri and Kenneth Ralston)
Tom Bertino
1994 Nominee - The Mask (shared with Jon Ferhat, Scott Squires and Steve "Spaz" Williams)
John Bruno
1984 Nominee - Ghostbusters (shared with Richard Edlund, Chuck Gaspar, and Mark Vargo)
1986 Nominee - Poltergeist II: The Other Side (shared with Richard Edlund, Bill Neil, and Gary Waller)
1989 Winner - The Abyss (shared with Dennis Muren, Dennis Skotak, and Hoyt Yeatman)
1992 Nominee - Batman Returns (shared with Craig Barron, Mike Fink, and Dennis Skotak)
1993 Nominee - Cliffhanger (shared with Pamela Easley, Neil Krepela, and John Richardson)
1994 Nominee - True Lies (shared with Thomas L. Fisher, Pat McClung, and Jacques Stroweis)
Rob Coleman
1999 Nominee - Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (shared with John Knoll, Scott Squires, and Dennis Muren)
2002 Nominee - Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones (shared with John Knoll, Pablo Helman, and Ben Snow)
Walt Conti
 :2000 Nominee - The Perfect Storm (shared with Stefan Fangmeier, John Frazier, and Habib Zargarpour)
Linwood G. Dunn
1966 Nominee - Hawaii
John Dykstra
1977 Winner - Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (shared with Robert Blalack, Richard Edlund, Grant McCune, and John Stears)
1979 Nominee - Star Trek: The Motion Picture (shared with Grant McCune, Dave Stewart, Robert Swarthe, Douglas Trumbull, and Richard Yuricich)
1999 Nominee - Stuart Little (shared with Eric Allard, Henry Anderson, and Jerome Chen)
2002 Nominee - Spider-Man (shared with John Frazier, Anthony LaMolinara, and Scott Stokdyk)
2004 Winner - Spider-Man 2 (shared with John Frazier, Anthony LaMolinara, and Scott Stokdyk)
Richard Edlund
1977 Winner - Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (shared with Robert Blalack, John Dykstra, Grant McCune, and John Stears)
1981 Winner - Raiders of the Lost Ark (shared with Joe Johnston, Bruce Nicholson, and Kit West)
1982 Nominee - Poltergeist (shared with Bruce Nicholson and Michael Wood)
1984 Nominee - 2010 (shared with George Jenson, Neil Krepela, and Mark Stetson)
1984 Nominee - Ghostbusters (shared with John Bruno, Chuck Gaspar, and Mark Vargo)
1986 Nominee - Poltergeist II: The Other Side (shared with John Bruno, Bill Neil, and Gary Waller)
1988 Nominee - Die Hard (shared with Brent Boates, Al Di Sarro, and Thaine Morris)
1992 Nominee - Alien³ (shared with George Gibbs, Alec Gillis, and Tom Woodruff, Jr.)
Leslie Ekker
1995 Nominee - Apollo 13 (shared with Michael Kanfer, Robert Legato and Matt Sweeney)
John Ellis
1985 Nominee - Young Sherlock Holmes (shared with Dave Allen, Dennis Muren, and Kit West)
Chris Evans
1988 Nominee - Willow (shared with Michael J. McAlister, Dennis Muren, and Phil Tippet)
Scott Farrar
1985 Winner - Cocoon (shared with David Berry, Ralph McQuarrie and Kenneth Ralston)
1991 Nominee - Backdraft (shared with Allen Hall, Clay Pinney, and Mikael Salomon)
2001 Nominee - A.I. Artificial Intelligence (shared with Michael Lantieri, Dennis Muren and Stan Winston)
2005 Nominee - The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (shared with Jim Berney, Bill Westenhofer, and Dean Wright)
2007 Nominee - Transformers (shared with Scott Benza, Russell Earl and John Frazier)
Bran Ferren
1986 Nominee - Little Shop of Horrors (shared with Lyle Conway and Martin Gutteridge)
Mike Fink
1992 Nominee - Batman Returns (shared with Craig Barron, John Bruno and Dennis Skotak)
2007 Winner - The Golden Compass (shared with Ben Morris, Bill Westenhofer, and Trevor Wood)
Terry D. Frazee
2003 Nominee - Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (shared with Charles Gibson, Hal T. Hickel and John Knoll)
John Gaeta
1999 Winner - The Matrix (shared with Steve Courtley, Janek Sirrs, and Jon Thum)
Steve Gawley
1989 Nominee - Back to the Future Part II (shared with John Bell, Michael Lantieri and Kenneth Ralston)
Bill George
1987 Winner - Innerspace (shared with Harley Jessup, Dennis Muren, and Kenneth Smith)
2004 Nominee - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (shared with Tim Burke, Roger Guyett, and John Richardson)
Richard Alan Greenberg
1987 Nominee - Predator (shared with Robert M. Greensberg, Joel Hynek, and Stan Winston)
Edward Hirsh
2001 Nominee - Pearl Harbor (shared with Eric Brevig, John Frazier, and Ben Snow)
Gregory Jein
1977 Nominee - Close Encounters of the Third Kind (shared with Roy Arbogast, Douglas Trumbull, Matthew Yuricich, and Richard Yuricich)
1979 Nominee - 1941 (shared with A.D. Flowers and William A. Fraker)
Ed Jones
1988 Nominee - Who Framed Roger Rabbit (shared with George Gibbs, Kenneth Ralston and Richard Williams)
John Knoll
1999 Nominee - Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (shared with Rob Coleman, Scott Squires, and Dennis Muren)
2002 Nominee - Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones (shared with Rob Coleman, Pablo Helman, and Ben Snow)
2003 Nominee - Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (shared with Terry D. Frazee, Charles Gibson, and Hal Hickel)
2006 Winner - Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (shared with Charles Gibson, Allen Hall, and Hal Hickel)
2007 Nominee - Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End (shared with Charles Gibson, Allen Hall, and Hal Hickel)
Neil Krepela
1984 Nominee - 2010 (shared with Richard Edlund, George Jenson, and Mark Stetson)
1993 Nominee - Cliffhanger (shared with John Bruno, Pamela Easley, and John Richardson)
Henry LaBounta
1996 Nominee - Twister (shared with Stefan Fangmeier, John Frazier, and Habib Zargarpour)
Michael Lantieri
1989 Nominee - Back to the Future Part II (shared with John Bell, Steve Gawley, and Kenneth Ralston
1991 Nominee - Hook (shared with Eric Brevig, Harley Jessup and Mark Sullivan)
1993 Winner - Jurassic Park (shared with Dennis Muren, Phil Tippett and Stan Winston)
1997 Nominee - The Lost World: Jurassic Park (shared with Randal M. Dutra, Dennis Muren and Stan Winston)
2001 Nominee - A.I. Artificial Intelligence (shared with Scott Farrar, Dennis Muren and Stan Winston)
Robert Legato
1995 Nominee - Apollo 13 (shared with Leslie Ekker, Michael Kanfer and Matt Sweeney)
1997 Winner - Titanic (shared with Thomas L. Fisher, Michael Kanfer, and Mark A. Lasoff)
Joe Letteri
2002 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (shared with Randall William Cook, Alex Funke, and Jim Rygiel)
2003 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (shared with Randall William Cook, Alex Funke, and Jim Rygiel)
2004 Nominee - I, Robot (shared with Andy Jones, Erik Nash, and John Nelson)
2005 Winner - King Kong (shared with Christian Rivers, Richard Taylor and Brian Van't Hul
Pat McClung
1994 Nominee - True Lies (shared with John Bruno, Thomas L. Fisher, and Jacques Stroweis)
1998 Nominee - Armageddon (shared with John Frazier and Richard Hoover)
Grant McCune
1977 Winner - Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (shared with Robert Blalack, John Dykstra, Richard Edlund, and John Stears)
1979 Nominee - Star Trek: The Motion Picture (shared with John Dykstra, Dave Stewart, Robert Swarthe, Douglas Trumbull, and Richard Yuricich)
George Murphy
1994 Nominee - Forrest Gump (shared with Allen Hall, Kenneth Ralston, and Stephen Rosenbaum)
Ralph McQuarrie
1985 Winner - Cocoon (shared with David Berry, Scott Farrar, and Kenneth Ralston)
Thaine Morris
1988 Nominee - Die Hard (shared with Brent Boates, Al Di Sarro and Richard Edlund)
Erik Nash
2004 Nominee - I, Robot (shared with Andy Jones, Joe Letteri, and John Nelson)
Bruce Nicholson
1981 Winner - Raiders of the Lost Ark (shared with Richard Edlund, Joe Johnston, and Kit West)
1982 Nominee - Poltergeist (shared with Richard Edlund and Michael Wood)
Clay Pinney
1991 Nominee - Backdraft (shared with Allen Hall, Scott Farrar and Mikael Salomon)
1996 Winner - Independence Day (shared with Volker Engel, Doug Smith and Joe Viskocil)
Lorne Peterson
1984 Winner - Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (shared with George Gibbs, Michael J. McAlister, and Dennis Muren)
Kenneth Ralston
1981 Nominee - Dragonslayer (shared with Brian Jonhson, Dennis Muren, and Phil Tippett)
1985 Winner - Cocoon (shared with David Berry, Scott Farrar, and Ralph McQuarrie)
1988 Winner - Who Framed Roger Rabbit (shared with George Gibbs, Ed Jones, and Richard Williams)
1989 Nominee - Back to the Future Part II (shared with John Bell, Steve Gawley, and Michael Lantieri)
1992 Winner - Death Becomes Her (shared with Doug Chiang, Douglas Smythe, and Tom Woodruff, Jr.)
1994 Winner - Forrest Gump (shared with Allen Hall, George Murphy, and Stephen Rosenbaum)
Jim Rygiel
2001 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (shared with Randall William Cook, Mark Stetson, and Richard Taylor)
2002 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (shared with Randall William Cook, Alex Funke, and Joe Letteri)
2003 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (shared with Randall William Cook, Alex Funke, and Joe Letteri)
Doug Smith and Joe Viskocil
1996 Nominees - Independence Day (shared with Volker Engel and Clay Pinney)
Douglas Smythe
1992 Nominee - Death Becomes Her (shared with Doug Chiang, Kenneth Ralston, and Tom Woodruff, Jr.)
Kenneth Smith
1982 Winner - E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (shared with Dennis Muren and Carlo Rambaldi)
1987 Winner - Innerspace (shared with Bill George, Harley Jessup, and Dennis Muren)
Scott Squires
1994 Nominee - The Mask (shared with Tom Bertino, Jon Ferhat, and Steve "Spaz" Williams)
1996 Nominee - Dragonheart (shared with James Satoru Straus, Phil Tippett, and Kit West)
1999 Nominee - Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace (shared with Rob Coleman, John Knoll, and Dennis Muren)
Mark Stetson
1984 Nominee - 2010 (shared with Richard Edlund, George Jenson, and Neil Krepela)
2001 Winner - The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (shared with Randall William Cook, Jim Rygiel, and Richard Taylor)
2006 Nominee - Superman Returns (shared with Neil Corbould, Richard Hoover and Jon Thum)
Dave Stewart and Robert Swarthe
1979 Nominee - Star Trek: The Motion Picture (shared with John Dykstra, Grant McCune, Robert Swarte, Douglas Trumball, and Richard Yuricich)
James Satoru Straus
1996 Nominee - Dragonheart (shared with Scott Squires, Phil Tippett, and Kit West)
Robert Stromberg
2003 Nominee - Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (shared with Stefan Fangmeier, and Nathan McGuinness)
Douglas Trumbull and Richard Yuricich
1977 Nominees - Close Encounters of the Third Kind (shared with Roy Argobast, Gregory Jein, and Matthew Yuricich)
1979 Nominees - Star Trek: The Motion Picture (shared with John Dykstra, Grant McCune, Dave Stewart, and Robert Swarthe)
1982 Nominees - Blade Runner (shared with David Dryer)
Mark Vargo
1984 Nominee - Ghostbusters (shared with John Bruno, Richard Edlund, and Chuck Gaspar)
Albert Whitlock
1967 Best Special Effects Nominee - Tobruk (shared with Howard A. Anderson)
Michael Wood
1982 Nominee - Poltergeist (shared with Richard Edlund and Bruce Nicholson)
Hoyt Yeatman
1989 Winner - The Abyss (shared with John Bruno, Dennis Muren, and Dennis Skotak)
1998 Nominee - Mighty Joe Young (shared with Rick Baker, Allen Hall, and Jim Mitchell)
Matthew Yuricich
1977 Nominee - Close Encounters of the Third Kind (shared with Roy Arbogast, Gregory Jein, Douglas Trumbull, and Richard Yuricich)
Habib Zargarpour
1996 Nominee - Twister (shared with Stefan Fangmeier, John Frazier, and Henry LaBounta)
2000 Nominee - The Perfect Storm (shared with Walt Conti, Stefan Fangmeier, and John Frazier)

Special AwardsEdit

Richard L. Anderson
1982 Special Achievement Award - Sound effects editing, Raiders of the Lost Ark (shared with Ben Burtt)
Greg Cannom
2005 Technical Achievement Award - modified silicone material for makeup applications (shared with Wes Wofford)
Loren Carpenter and Rob Cook
1993 Scientific and Engineering Award - "RenderMan" software (shared with Anthony A. Apodaca, Ed Catmull, Pat Hanrahan, Darwyn Peachey, and Thomas Porter)
2001 Academy Award of Merit - advancements in motion picture rendering (shared with Ed Catmull)
Les Dittert
1994 Scientific and Engineering Award - Digital Motion Picture Retouching System (shared with George H. Joblove, Mark Leather, and Douglas Smythe)
1995 Scientific and Engineering Award - CCD (Charge Coupled Device) film input scanning systems (shared with Bill Bishop, Ray Feeney, and Will McCown)
Tom Duff
1996 Scientific and Engineering Award - pioneering inventions in digital image compositing (shared with Ed Catmull, Thomas Porter, and Alvy Ray Smith)
1998 Scientific and Engineering Award - particle systems used to create computer generated visual effects in motion pictures (shared with Sam Leffler, Eben Ostby, and William Reeves)
Linwood G. Dunn
1945 Technical Achievement Award - Acme-Dunn Optical Printer (shared with Cecil Love)
1979 Medal of Commendation - outstanding service and dedication in upholding the high standards of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (shared with Loren L. Ryder and Waldon O. Watson)
1981 Academy Award of Merit - Acme-Dunn Optical Printer (shared with Cecil Love)
1985 Gordon E. Sawyer Award
John Dykstra
1978 Scientific and Engineering Award - Dykstraflex Camera/Electronic Motion Control System (shared with Jeffy Jeffress and Alvah Miller)
Richard Edlund
1981 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, Star Wars: Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back (shared with Brian Johnson, Dennis Muren, and Bruce Nicholson)
1982 Scientific and Engineering Award - beam-splitter optical composite motion picture printer
1982 Scientific and Engineering Award - Empire Motion Picture Camera System
1984 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (shared with Dennis Muren, Kenneth Ralston, and Phil Tippett)
1987 Scientific and and Engineering Award - Zoom Aerial (ZAP) 65mm Optical Printer (shared with David Grafton, Jerry Jeffress, Mark West, Gene Whitman, and Robert Wilcox)
Bran Ferren
1983 Technical Achievement Award - computerized lighting effect system
1987 Technical Achievement Award - laser synchro-cue system for applications in the motion picture industry
1987 Scientific and Engineering Award - advanced optical printer (shared with Charles Harrison and Kenneth Wisner)
Stephen Hunter Flick and John Pospisil
1988 Special Achievement Award - Sound effects editing, RoboCop
2007 Medal of Commendation
Scott Leva
2006 Technical Achievement Award - Precision Stunt Airbag
Joe Litteri
2004 Technical Achievement Award - groundbreaking implementations of practical methods for rendering skin and other translucent materials using subsurface scattering techniques (shared with Christophe Hery and Ken McGaugh)
Thaine Morris
1988 Technical Achievement Award - DSC Spark Devices for special effects (shared with David Pier)
Thomas Porter
1993 Scientific and Engineering Award - "RenderMan" software (shared with Anthony A. Apodaca, Ed Catmull, Loren Carpenter, Rob Cook, Pat Hanrahan, and Darwyn Peachey)
1996 Scientific and Engineering Award - pioneering inventions in digital image compositing (shared with Ed Catmull, Tom Duff, and Alvy Ray Smith)
1998 Scientific and Engineering Award - digital paint systems (shared with Richard Shoup and Alvy Ray Smith)
Kenneth Ralston
1984 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (shared with Richard Edlund, Dennis Muren, and Phil Tippett)
William Reeves
1997 Scientific and Engineering Award - particle systems used to create computer generated visual effects in motion pictures
1998 Scientific and Engineering Award - Marionette Three-Dimensional Computer Animation System (shared with Tom Duff, Sam Leffler, and Eben Ostby)
Alvy Ray Smith
1996 Scientific and Engineering Award - pioneering inventions in digital image compositing (shared with Ed Catmull, Tom Duff, and Thomas Porter)
1998 Scientific and Engineering Award - digital paint systems (shared with Richard Shoup and Thomas Porter)
Douglas Smyth
1993 Technical Achievement Award - the MORF system (shared with Tom Brigham)
1994 Scientific and Engineering Award - Digital Motion Picture Retouching System (shared with Les Dittert, George H. Joblove, and Mark Leather)
1996 Technical Achievement Award - ILM digital film compositing system (shared with Lincoln Hu and Douglas S. Kay)
Scott Squires
1995 Scientific and Engineering Award - film input scanning (shared with Dan Cameron, Gary Demos, David DiFrancesco, and Gary Starkweather)
Douglas Trumbull
1993 Scientific and Engineering Award - CP-65 Showscan Camera System (shared with Robert Auguste, Edmund DiGiulio, and Geoffrey Williamson)
Orson Welles
1971 Honorary Award - superlative artistry and versatility in the creation of motion pictures
Albert Whitlock
1975 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, Earthquake (shared with Frank Brendel and Glen Robinson)
1976 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, The Hindenburg (shared with Glen Robinson)
Robert Wise
1967 Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award
Hoyt Yeatman
2000 Technical Achievement Award - Identification and diagnosis leading to the elimination of the "red fringe" artifact in traveling matte composite photography (shared with John C. Brewer)
Matthew Yuricich
1977 Special Achievement Award - Visual effects, Logan's Run (shared with L.B. Abbott and Glen Robinson)

Note on Dates for STII/III & IVEdit

It has been widely accepted that Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Star Trek III: The Search for Spock took place in the year 2285, and that Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home took place in 2286. However, a contradiction currently lies with these dates, at least if the information on Memory Alpha is assumed to be correct.

Although it has not been established, James T. Kirk's birthday has been widely accepted as falling on March 22nd (which is actor William Shatner's birthday). If that date is correct, then Star Trek II takes place on March 23rd of an unspecified year sometime after 2284, when Kirk returned to Starfleet following his first retirement (as revealed in Star Trek Generations). However, the contradiction lies here:

Star Trek III could not have happened too long after the events in Star Trek II, perhaps a week or two later at the most. This would place both movies as occuring between March 22nd and mid-April in a given year. However, Star Trek IV is specifically stated to have taken place three months after Star Trek III, meaning STIV would take place no later than July of the same year. In other words, using Kirk's accepted birthdate as a reference, all three films must take place within the same year, either 2285 or 2286. However, because Kirk's birthdate has never been established on-screen or in dialogue, we can assume that his birth could have come at a later date.

Personally, I'm all for ignoring the Romulan ale date and just place Star Trek II in 2282, 15 years after "Space Seed", as stated in the film. For all we know, the date on the bottle was a Romulan year. There's also the fact that the writers had intended to give Kirk's age in the film as 49. Since Kirk was born in 2233, 2233 + 49 = 2282. Besides, there's no canon source stating the film took place in '85.

Boston TrekEdit

Here you'll find a list of Star Trek performers who have appeared on ABC's hit series, Boston Legal.

  • Title: Boston Legal
  • Network: American Broadcasting Company (ABC)
  • Official Website: Click here
  • First Aired: 3 October 2004
  • Last Aired: 8 December 2008
  • Number of Episodes: 101
  • First Episode: "Head Cases"
  • Last Episode: "Made in China"/"Last Call" (aired back-to-back as two-hour series finale)
Name Character(s) Episode(s) Date(s)
Crystal Allen Maddie Taylor "Schmidt Happens" 9-01-2005
Sam Anderson Walter Fife "From Whence We Came" 16-01-2005
Steven Anderson Walter Seymore "Head Cases", "Still Crazy After All These Years", "Catch and Release", "Mad Cows", "Made in China" 3-10-2004–17-10-2004; 3-11-2008–8-12-2008
Chris Antonucci unknown "Spring Fever" 16-05-2006
Rene Auberjonois Paul Lewiston Various (recurring, 2004-05; regular, 2005-2007), "Oral Contracts", "Mad Cows", "Made in China"/"Last Call" 3-10-2004–8-12-2008
Scott Bakula Jack Ross "Glow in the Dark" 12-02-2008
Lisa Banes Attorney Kimberly Mellon "Truly, Madly, Deeply" 8-11-2005
Ed Begley, Jr. Clifford Cabot "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", "Spring Fever", "Selling Sickness" 21-03-2006–06-02-2007
Fran Bennett Judge Diane Avent "Shock and Oww!" 7-03-2006
John Berg Judge Robert Hober "Schadenfreude" 4-10-2005
Corbin Bernsen Attorney Eli Granger "...There's Fire!" 28-02-2006
Michael Bofshever Charles Costello "Guise 'n Dolls" 24-04-2007
David Bowe Jeffrey Addario "Guardians and Gatekeepers" 29-09-2008
Ivar Brogger Professor Tyler "Attack of the Xenophobes" 13-11-2007
Jason Brooks Justin Murray "The Black Widow," "Schadenfreude" 27-09-2005–4-10-2005
Ellen Bry Attorney Shelby Morris "Lincoln", "On the Ledge" 26-11-2006–28-11-2006
David Burke D.A. Casey Mathias "'Til We Meat Again", "Spring Fever" 13-02-2006–16-05-2006
Ron Canada Judge Willard Reese Various (recurring) 14-02-2006–1-12-2008
Christopher Carroll Judge Stephen Bickel "Catch and Release", "Men to Boys", "Word Salad Days" 17-10-2004–28-03-2006
Joanna Cassidy Beverly Bridge-Crane Various (recurring, 2006) 10-01-2006–28-02-2006
Larry Cedar Robert Hopper "The Cancer Man Can" 10-01-2006
Art Chudabala Peter Clark "The Cancer Man Can" 10-01-2006
Charles Chun Dr. Jeffrey Wong "Schadenfreude" 4-10-2005
Jude Ciccolella General Robert Seagram "Patriot Acts" 21-05-2008
David Clennon Attorney Braxton Mason "An Eye for an Eye"; "The Gods Must Be Crazy" 31-10-2006–14-05-2008
Dennis Cockrum Officer James Jacobs; Detective Gary Jacobs "Change of Course"; "Spring Fever" 24-10-2004; 16-05-2006
Paul Collins Lance Buttram "Smoke Signals" 22-09-2008
Kelly Connell Attorney John Hoberg "Helping Hands", "Word Salad Days" 17-01-2006–28-03-2006
Robert Costanzo Wayne Picker "Duck and Cover 15-05-2007
John Cragen Paramedic "Hired Guns" 19-12-2004
Steven Culp ADA Norman Wilson "Oral Contracts" 4-12-2007
Ann Cusack Dr. Donna Follette "Angel of Death" 1-09-2007
Gregg Daniel Dr. Jason Marcini "The Object of My Affection" 6-11-2007
Elizabeth Dennehy Samantha Taylor "Roe v. Wade, The Musical" 22-01-2008
Paul Dooley Judge Wendel Donahue "Hope and Gory" 30-10-2007
David Doty Judge Ephraim Woods "Happy Trails" 27-10-2008
Larry Drake Bishop Luke Bernard "The Gods Must Be Crazy" 14-05-2008
Lee Duncan Justice Thomas "The Court Supreme", "Last Call" 22-04-2008–8-12-2008
Charles Emmett Detective Smiley "Hired Guns" 19-12-2004
Michael Ensign Judge Paul Resnick Various (recurring) 17-10-2004–27-10-2008
Van Epperson Dr. Paul Rawlings "True Love" 13-10-2008
Patrick Fabian Attorney Stanley Gould "Mad About You" 15-01-2008
Richard Fancy Father Michael Ryan "Gone", "Legal Deficits" 6-12-2005–13-12-3005
Miriam Flynn Gretchen Winters "The Object of My Affection" 6-11-2007
Michelle Forbes Juliette Monroe "The Nutcrackers" 5-12-2006
Robert Foxworth Judge Simon Devon "BL: Los Angeles" 16-05-2006
Bruce French Dr. Ted Thiel "The Mighty Rogues" 15-04-2008
Colby French Officer Taylor Jessel "No Brains Left Behind" 11-12-2007
Megan Gallagher Gigi Gering "Helping Hands" 17-01-2006
David Gautreaux A.A.G. Marshall Brickman "Juiced" 1-12-2008
Louis Giambalvo Judge Franzetti "An Eye for an Eye" 31-10-2004
Henry Gibson Judge Clark Brown Various (recurring) 21-11-2004–1-12-2008
Marcy Goldman Jury Foreperson "An Eye for an Eye" 31-10-2004
April Grace Attorney Regina Williams "Tea and Sympathy" 1-05-2007
Bruce Gray Dr. Earl Roberts "The Gods Must Be Crazy" 14-05-2008
Zach Grenier Attorney Chris Randolph "Witches of Mass Destruction", "Nuts" 1-11-2005–1-16-2007
Bob Gunton Attorney William Connolly "The Court Supreme" 22-04-2008
Michael G. Hagerty Wally Bird "Son of the Defender" 3-04-2007
Henry Hayashi Dr. Lee "Truth Be Told" 7-11-2004
Grainger Hines Jensen "Happy Trails" 27-10-2008
Gregory Itzin A.D.A. Todd Milken "The Black Widow", "Schadenfreude" 27-09-2005–4-10-2005
Jim Jansen Marshall Kennedy "Guise 'n Dolls", "Mad Cows", "Made in China" 24-04-2007–8-12-2008
Leslie Jordan Bernard Ferrion Various (recurring, 2005) 9-01-2005–11-10-2005
Robert Joy A.D.A. William Preston "Change of Course", "Tortured Souls" 24-10-2004–2-20-2005
Lisa Kaminir D.A. Valerie Murrow "Schmidt Happens", "Finding Nimmo", "A Whiff and a Prayer" 9-01-2005–18-10-2005
Matthew Kaminsky Mike Beckett "Nuts" 1-16-2007
Daniel Hugh Kelly William Brewster "The Mighty Rogues" 15-04-2008
Leonard Kelly-Young Hugh McDowell "The Gods Must Be Crazy" 14-05-2008
David A. Kimball George Knott "Finding Nimmo" 11-10-2005
Scott Klace Dr. Mitchell Levinson "Selling Sickness" 6-02-2007
Thomas Knickerbocker Dr. Mahoney "Still Crazy After All These Years" 10-10-2004
Dr. Rich Farrell "The Chicken and the Leg" 9-10-2007
Thomas Kopache Judge Dale Wallace "Change of Course", "A Greater Good" 24-10-2004–12-12-2004
Clyde Kusatsu Judge Matsumura "The Nutcrackers" 5-12-2006
Ken Land Dr. Samuel Williams "Word Salad Days" 28-03-2006
John Larroquette Carl Sack Various (regular, 2007-) 25-09-2007–8-12-2008
Sharon Lawrence Judge Rita Sharpley "Head Cases" 3-10-2004
Stephen Lee Aaron Sears "Son of the Defender" 3-04-2007
Aaron Lustig Dr. Herbert Waylon "Hired Guns" 19-12-2004
Wolfgang Blitzkrieg "Indecent Proposals" 30-04-2008
Scott MacDonald Officer Michael Minden "Breast in Show" 7-02-2006
Derek Magyar Gregory Stone "An Eye for an Eye" 31-10-2006
Matt Malloy Donald Wharton "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" 21-03-2006
Christopher J. Marcinko Juror "Schadenfreude" 4-10-2005
Dakin Matthews Judge Harvey Fletcher "Angel of Death" 1-09-2007
Billy Mayo Detective Sean Wilkins "Gone", "Son of the Defender" 6-12-2005–3-04-2007
Taylor McCluskey Thug #2 "Too Much Information" 24-01-2006
J. Patrick McCormack Judge Sean O'Byrne "Finding Nimmo" 11-10-2005
Richard McGonagle A.A.G. Norman Wood "Patriot Acts" 21-05-2008
Michael McKean Dwight Biddle "Truly, Madly, Deeply" 8-11-2005
Don McManus Attorney John Lennox Various (recurring) 3-10-2006–29-09-2008
Andy Milder Dr. Gill "Still Crazy After All These Years" 10-10-2004
Bob Morrisey Dr. Joshua Forbes "Men to Boys" 25-10-2005
Mark Moses Attorney George McDougal "Hope and Gory", "Roe" 30-10-2007–10-11-2008
Christopher Neiman Mr. Prigg "Dumping Bella" 1-30-2007
Alex Nevil Terry "Breast in Show" 7-02-2006
Randy Oglesby Walter Edmunds "The Black Widow" 27-09-2005
Conor O'Farrell A.D.A. Glenn Jackson "Death Be Not Proud" 20-03-2005
Jim O'Heir Gil Furnald "Loose Lips" 28-11-2004
Shannon O'Hurley Phyllis Deaver "Smile" 14-02-2006
Tom Ormeny Man #1 "Head Cases" 3-10-2004
Ed O'Ross Judge Phillip Stevens "Hired Guns" 19-12-2004
Holmes Osborne Mayor George Bostwick "'Til We Meet Again" 13-02-2006
Ron Ostrow Attorney Everett Cone "The Black Widow" 27-09-2005
Jennifer Parsons Dr. Reesa Klaywig "Word Salad Days" 28-03-2006
Ethan Phillips Michael Schiller "Desperately Seeking Shirley", "Whose God Is It Anyway?", "The Verdict" 3-10-2006–24-10-2006
Joel Polis Attorney Eric Yavitch "Word Salad Days" 28-03-2006
Lawrence Pressman Judge Floyd Hurwitz "Son of the Defender", "The Mighty Rogues" 3-04-2007–15-04-2008
Andrew Prine Sam Wolfson "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang" 21-03-2006
Ray Proscia Paul Schwimmer "Squid Pro Quo" 9-05-2006
John Prosky Attorney Walt Devlin "Rescue me" 19-02-2008
Don Pugsley Prisoner #4 "Beauty and the Beast" 25-09-2007
Gina Ravarra Dr. Amanda Gerard "A Greater Good" 12-12-2004
Lorna Raver Judge Katherine Taylor "An Eye for an Eye", "Deep End of the Poole" 31-10-2004–2-05-2006
Richard Riehle Dr. Barry Glouberman "Ass Fat Jungle" 15-11-2005
Daniel Roebuck Russell Blayney "Shock and Oww!" 7-03-2006
Stephen Root Ethan Melman "Tabloid Nation" 8-04-2008
Christine Rose Meredith Waters "Men to Boys" 25-10-2005
Saul Rubinek Donald Feldcamp "Kill, Baby, Kill" 17-11-2008
Alan Ruck Attorney Wayne Davidson "Kill, Baby, Kill" 17-11-2008
Vyto Ruginis Captain Larry McDonald "Tortured Souls" 20-02-2005
Leon Russom Colonel George Hegarty "Guantanamo by the Bay" 8-05-2007
Jeri Ryan Courtney Reese "Spring Fever", "BL: Los Angeles" 16-05-2006
Kat Sawyer-Young Judge Martha Brenford "Death Be Not Proud" 20-03-2005
Roger Schueller Associate partner Various (recurring) 2004 – 2007
Neighbor 1 episode 2006
Pamela Segall Attorney Emma Path "The Object of My Affection", "Attack of the Xenophobes", "Rescue Me", "Dances with Wolves" 6-11-2007–6-10-2008
William Shatner Denny Crane Various (regular) 3-10-2004–8-12-2008
Jack Shearer Night Court Judge "An Eye for an Eye" 31-10-2006
Justice Antonin Scalia "The Court Supreme", "Last Call" 22-04-2008–8-12-2008
Armin Shimerman Judge Brian Hooper Various (recurring, 2006) 19-09-2006–31-10-2006
John Short Dr. Raymond Young "'Til We Meat Again" 13-02-2005
Scott Alan Smith Dr. Randall "Questionable Characters" 21-11-2004
Bill Smitrovich Virginia D.A. Jack Fitzhug "Kill, Baby, Kill" 17-11-2008
Todd Stashwick Matthew Calder "Head Cases" 3-10-2004
Brenda Strong Judge Judy Beacon "True Love" 13-10-2008
Mark L. Taylor Attorney Adam Jovanka Various (recurring) 24-01-2006–9-10-2007
Lamont D. Thompson Officer Aaron Payne "The Attack of the Xenophobes" 13-11-2007
Tony Todd Detective Walter Berenson "The Innocent Man" 2-10-2007
Ned Vaughn USDA Rep Joel Bevis "Mad Cows" 3-11-2008
Tom Virtue Father Tulley "Hope and Gory" 30-10-2007
Brian Vowell White collar criminal "Lincoln" 26-11-2006
Todd Waring Daniel Ralston "Catch and Release" 17-10-2004
Derek Webster Dr. Giles Bromfield "The Mighty Rogues" 15-04-2008
Annie Wersching Ellen Tanner "The Nutcrackers" 5-12-2006
Phil Weyland Clerk "Do Tell", "True Love" 16-10-2007–13-10-2008
Diz White Secretary "Too Much Information" 24-01-2006
Michael Shamus Wiles Ned Hayden "Too Much Information" 24-01-2006
Jennifer Williams Foreperson "True Love" 13-10-2008
Matt Williamson Sean Harmon "The Object of My Affection" 4-11-2007
Matt Winston Ryan Chism "The Bad Seed" 20-10-2008
Michael Wiseman D.A. Bret Haber "Schmidt Happens", "Hope and Gory" 9-01-2005–30-10-2007
D. Elliot Woods The Man (uncredited) "Can't We All Get a Lung?" 19-09-2006
Patti Yasutake Dr. Claire Simon (uncredited) "...There's Fire!" 28-02-2006
Wayne Thomas Yorke Waiter "Men to Boys" 25-10-2005
Dey Young Sarah Berman "A Greater Good" 12-12-2004

Dark Knight Trek Edit

The following people worked on both The Dark Knight and Star Trek:

Darkly Treks the Duck Edit

The following people worked on both Darkwing Duck and Star Trek:

Barton MacLane Edit

I created the following article believing that the subject, a noted veteran actor, had appeared on Star Trek. I should have researched a bit more before spending my time working on the article. Long story short, it turned out he didn't appear on Trek so his page had to be deleted. By I worked hard on the page and was proud of the end result before learning it was all for nothing, so here it is in all its glory.

Barton MacLane (25 December 19021 January 1969; age 66) was an American actor, playwright, and screenwriter who portrayed the Planetary Doctor in "This Side of Paradise", a first season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. Although he has appeared in many classic films from the 1930s through the 1960s, he was perhaps best known for his recurring role as General Martin Peterson on the 1960s television comedy series I Dream of Jeannie.

Early life and career Edit

MacLane was born in Columbia, South Carolina, and attended Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, where he excelled at American football. He then attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City. He began acting during the 1920s, making his film debut in the 1926 silent sports comedy The Quarterback, which played to his strengths as a football player.

He made his Broadway stage debut the following year, playing the assistant district attorney in Bayard Veiller's The Trial of Mary Duggan. He then performed in the 1928 Broadway production of Gods of the Lighting with Ian Wolfe and was part of the original cast of Subway Express as Officer Mulvaney in 1929. He also appeared in the Marx Brothers' 1929 film The Cocoanuts.

MacLane made his first credited film appearance in the 1931 romantic drama His Woman. In April 1932, he acted alongside Marc Lawrence in the Broadway play The Tree. That same year, he performed again on Broadway in the play Ravenous, which he also wrote. His last Broadway performance was in Yellow Jack in 1934.

Film work: 1930s-1950s Edit

The success of Ravenous landed him a contract with Warner Bros. and brought him to the attention of several renowned film directors. As a result, throughout the remainder of the 1930s, MacLane was highly active in film, with major supporting roles in such productions as The Case of the Curious Bride, G Men, The Prince and the Pauper, and Fritz Lang's You Only Live Once and You and Me. He also played the role of detective Steve McBride in the many films involving fictional news reporter Torchy Blane.

During the 1930s and 1940s, MacLane worked alongside legendary movie star Humphrey Bogart in several films, including San Quentin (with the aforementioned Marc Lawrence), All Through the Night (with Judith Anderson), and High Sierra. Perhaps most notably, MacLane played Detective Dundy opposite Bogart's Sam Spade in writer/director John Huston's acclaimed, Academy Award-nominated film classic, The Maltese Falcon. MacLane's fellow TOS guest actor Elisha Cook, Jr. also had a role in this film. MacLane again collaborated with both Bogart and Huston on the Academy Award-winning 1948 adventure film The Treasure of the Sierra Madre.

MacLane's many other film credits during the 1940s include Victor Fleming's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Fritz Lang's Western Union, Reginald Le Borg's The Mummy's Ghost, Frank Borzage's The Spanish Main, and Roy Del Ruth's Red Light (the latter of which co-starred Phillip Pine). He also appeared in two Tarzan films, 1945's Tarzan and the Amazons and 1947's Tarzan and the Huntress. Some of MacLane's films during the 1950s include Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (with Kenneth Tobey), The Glenn Miller Story, Foxfire (directed by Joseph Pevney), and Three Violent People.

Television and final films Edit

In the 1950s, MacLane began to appear regularly on television. Between 1953 and 1967, he appeared on such programs as Four Star Playhouse (with Hal Baylor and Richard Hale), Studio 57, Conflict (with Richard Webb), 77 Sunset Strip, Black Saddle (with Vic Perrin), The Munsters, and Gunsmoke (two episodes: one with Michael Ansara and France Nuyen, another with Sam Gilman and Steve Ihnat).

During the 1960-61 television season, MacLane was a series regular on NBC's short-lived western, Outlaws, in which he played Marshal Frank Caine. He also guest-starred in several episodes of Perry Mason (working with Richard Hale, Jon Lormer, and Meg Wyllie) and Laramie (including an episode with Michael Forest and Frank Overton). He continued appearing in films, as well, including Frank Capra's Academy Award-nominated 1961 comedy Pocketful of Miracles and several westerns, including 1965's Town Tamer, on which MacLane worked with DeForest Kelley over two years before co-starring together on Star Trek.

MacLane was cast in the recurring role of General Martin Peterson on I Dream of Jeannie in 1965. He appeared in 35 episodes of the series between 1965 and 1969, during which time he worked with such performers as Booth Colman, Byron Morrow, Davis Roberts, Vic Tayback, Kenneth Washington, and the aforementioned Michael Ansara and Steve Ihnat. Three of MacLane's episodes were aired after his January 1969 death in Santa Monica, California, at the age of 66. He was survived by his wife, actress Charlotte Wynters, who died in 1991.

External links Edit

Facts of the USS Kelvin Edit

  • The USS Kelvin, NCC-0514, is commanded by Captain Richard Robau, with George Samuel Kirk, Sr., serving as first officer. Kirk's wife, Winona, also serves aboard the Kelvin.
  • The Kelvin is destroyed in an attack by the Romulan ship Narada, commanded by Nero, circa 2233.
  • The impulse engines of the Kelvin are powered by four deuterium fusion reactors.
  • The ship has a single warp nacelle housing the ship's warp drive engine, with two rows of massive semi-circular warp-field coils inside.
  • Contains phaser turrets that can either fire bolts of high concentrated energy or less powerful beams.
  • Ship's chief of security is Alnschloss K'Bentayr of the planet Monchezke; ship's helmsman is Michael Johnson of Seattle, Washington
  • Used primarily as a survey vessel.

Timeline of alternate reality Edit

Time span within the film Star Trek
2230: Spock is born. (deleted scene)
2233: Nero and the Narada arrive from the year 2387; USS Kelvin is destroyed; James T. Kirk is born; Nero and the Narada captured by the Klingons (deleted scene)
2241: George Samuel Kirk runs away from home (deleted scene); Jim Kirk plunges his step-father's Corvette into a quarry; Spock gets into a fight with a Vulcan bully
2249: Spock declines admittance into the Vulcan Science Academy and enters Starfleet Academy
2254: Spock begins programming the Kobayashi Maru scenario (referred to but not seen)
2255: Kirk meets Uhura and gets into a fight with a group of Starfleet cadets; Kirk is convinced by Christopher Pike to enter Starfleet Academy; Dr. Leonard McCoy enters Starfleet Academy and meets James Kirk
2258: Nero escapes from Klingon prison planet Rura Penthe, frees his crew, and reclaims the Narada (deleted scene); the remainder of the film takes place in this year
More detailed fan-created timeline
  • 2233
The USS Kelvin, en route to Earth, changes course to investigate strange gravimetric readings near the edge of Klingon space. The crew discovers what they describe as "a lightning storm in space," which years later will be revealed to be a singularity created using red matter. The Kelvin is attacked by the Narada, which emerges from the singularity, having been transported from the year 2387. Captain Richard Robau, the commanding officer of the Kelvin, is killed by Nero, captain of the Narada. Lieutenant George Kirk, now in command of the Kelvin, gives the order to abandon ship. To ensure that the evac shuttles are not destroyed, Kirk remains aboard the Kelvin, using the ship's weapons against those of the Narada that were targeting the fleeing shuttles. Kirk sacrifices himself by ramming the Kelvin into the Narada, disabling the attacking vessel and ensuring the safe escape of the surviving Kelvin crew.
Winona Kirk gives birth to James T. Kirk aboard Medical shuttle 37. The shuttles carrying the surviving Kelvin crew return to Earth, and Winona takes baby Jim to their home in Riverside, Iowa, where Winona reunites with her first son, George Samuel Kirk. Memorials for the crew members lost in the attack are held at Starfleet and elsewhere around the world. A dedication is made to those who perished, and separate dedications are made for George Kirk in San Francisco and Riverside.
The survivors of the Kelvin report on the attack to Starfleet Command, including the description of the "lightning storm in space" and the appearance of their attackers. Using telemetry gathered from the shuttles, Starfleet is able to ascertain that the attacking ship, though highly advanced, is Romulan in design. For the first time since the end of the Earth-Romulan War, contact is made with the Romulan Empire, who deny any involvement in the attack. Using scans of the Narada, Starfleet Science begins to make advancements to existing Starfleet technology in preparation for potential attacks by more advanced Romulan ships.
Having drifted into Klingon space, the disabled Narada is captured by the Klingons and its crew deemed prisoners of the Klingon Empire. After a speedy trial, Nero and his crew are sentenced to life imprisonment on Rura Penthe. The Klingons begin studying the advanced technology of the Narada and begin to modify their own warships.
  • 2236
A new shipyard is built in Riverside in honor of George Kirk, Sr. The first ship to be built there is the USS Kirk, named in his honor.
Christopher Pike, a fourth-year cadet at Starfleet Academy, is assigned the USS Kelvin for his dissertation. During his research, he gains a great amount of respect and admiration for George Kirk. Pike receives high praise for his dissertation, and graduates from the Academy three months later with the rank of lieutenant.
  • 2237
Hikaru Sulu is born in San Francisco on Earth.
Nyota Uhura is born on Earth.
  • 2240
Pike is promoted to the rank of captain after only four years of active service, the fastest in Starfleet history. Pike later accepts command of the USS Republic.
Montgomery Scott enters Starfleet Academy. He ranks at the top in all of his engineering classes.
Starfleet officer Larisa Irinova, a survivor from the USS Kelvin's destruction, ends her seven-year-commitment on Luna. She returns to her native Russia, where she meets her soon-to-be-husband, Andrei Chekov.
  • 2241
Winona Kirk marries her late husband's brother, Frank Kirk. Unbeknown to Winona, however, Frank does not treat her children well, and even physically abuses George Kirk, Jr.
Captain Christopher Pike embarks on a five-year-mission of exploration in command of the USS Republic.
Montgomery Scott becomes the Academy aide for Admiral Jonathan Archer's Advanced Relativistic Mechanics course.
Pavel Chekov is born, four years earlier than his prime counterpart, a result of his parents meeting earlier than they did in the prime reality.
Winona Kirk is assigned as a science officer aboard the USS Republic upon the personal request of Captain Pike. Winona accepts the position, leaving her two sons in the hands of Frank. With Winona off-planet, Frank decides to sell his late brother's antique Corvette Stingray. Fed up with his step-father's abuse and angered by his decision to sell his father's beloved car, George Kirk, Jr., runs away from home. Rather than have the car be sold, eight-year-old Jim Kirk steals the vehicle and takes it on a joyride through the plains of Iowa before driving it into a quarry. Jim escapes from the car before it goes over and is taken into police custody. After being released, he is severely beaten by Frank, but the beating is stopped by George Kirk, Jr., who returns to stay and protect his brother.
On Vulcan, eleven-year-old Spock engages in a fist-fight with a Vulcan bully after the bully and his friends insult Spock's Vulcan father, Sarek, and his Human mother, Amanda Grayson. Sarek later has a talk with Spock to discuss the importance of controlling one's emotions and the reasons he married Amanda, proclaiming that it was "logical."
  • 2244
Montgomery Scott graduates from Starfleet Academy, first in his class.
Leonard McCoy, attending the University of Mississippi, meets Jocelyn Darnell.
  • 2245
Leonard McCoy graduates from the University of Mississippi and enrolls in Medical School.
  • 2246
Construction begins on the USS Constitution, the first of a new experimental class of ship, the Constitution class. With the advanced technology created using telemetry from the ship which attacked the USS Kelvin thirteen years ago, it is estimated to take approximately five years to build.
The USS Republic is among the starships which bring aid to the colony on Tarsus IV. They arrive to find that almost the entire colony has been wiped out at the order of Governor Kodos. Of the survivors, only seven lent witness to Kodos' order. Noted among the dead are former Starfleet officer and communications specialist Hoshi Sato and her husband and the entire Riley family, including the young Kevin Riley.
Captain Pike completes his five-year mission in command of the USS Republic. The Republic is pulled from active duty and recommissioned for Academy use only. Pike is offered a promotion to admiral, but refuses. Pike, impacted by the deaths of hundreds of families on Tarsus IV, decides to take a leave of absence and returns to his native Mojave on Earth.
  • 2248
Leonard McCoy, still attending Medical School, marries Jocelyn Darnell.
  • 2250
Spock is accepted into the Vulcan Science Academy, but declines admission after the Academy's head minister refers to being half-Human as a "disadvantage." He is subsequently admitted into Starfleet Academy.
  • 2251
After five years away, Christopher Pike returns to Starfleet and is reinstated at the rank of captain, having again refused a promotion to admiral. He is also given the option to command any available assignment of his choosing. Rather than choosing a starship, he asks to be assigned to the Academy Recruitment Division. Starfleet accepts, and he is made Executive Officer of recruiting.
Construction on the USS Constitution is complete. The vessel performs admirably in its shakedown cruise, but is in need of further tests before being commissioned.
  • 2252
The USS Constitution is launched.
Leonard McCoy graduates from Medical School and becomes a doctor.
  • 2253
With the successful launch of the USS Constitution, construction on more Constitution-class starships is approved. The first to be approved in the USS Enterprise, to be built at the Riverside Shipyard.
  • 2254
Construction on the USS Enterprise begins.
Spock graduates from Starfleet Academy, having specialized in computer programming. Rather than accepting assignment to a starship, he volunteers to instruct courses on such topics as interspecies ethics and advanced phonology. He also begins programming the Academy's Kobayashi Maru simulation.
Hikaru Sulu and Nyota Uhura enter Starfleet Academy. Sulu becomes top of his class in astrosciences and advanced botany, and is second in his class in helm operations. Uhura studies xenolinguistics, becoming top of her class in advanced phonology and advanced acoustical engineering. She becomes Spock's most promising student.
Pavel Chekov is admitted to Starfleet Academy at the age of 13, becoming the youngest person in Starfleet history to be accepted into the Academy. He becomes top of his class in stellar cartography and transporter theory and an expert in advanced theoretical physics.
Leonard and Jocelyn McCoy divorce. Jocelyn receives the majority of Dr. McCoy's belongings and leaves McCoy in a depression.
  • 2255
Following an academic break, Uhura returns to the Academy for her sophomore year. She arrives in Riverside, Iowa, to board the recruitment shuttle leaving for the Academy. She visits the nearby Shipyard Bar, where she meets 22-year-old James T. Kirk, now a rebellious vagabond. Kirk is subsequently involved in a brawl with four cadets, which is ultimately broken up by Captain Pike. Pike ultimately convinces Kirk to enroll in Starfleet Academy so he can find meaning in his life and put his intelligence to good use.
Leonard McCoy decides to enroll in Starfleet Academy. He arrives in Riverside and boards the recruitment shuttle, where he meets and befriends Jim Kirk.
Jim Kirk distinguishes himself in his first year at the Academy. He becomes top of his class survival strategies and tactical analysis, and also performs exceptionally in other command and tactical-oriented courses. After performing above and beyond the call of duty during a one-month academic mission aboard the USS Republic, he receives the brevet rank of ensign, the first cadet to receive such an honor in their first year at the Academy.
  • 2256
Uhura becomes Academy aide to Lieutenant Spock for his advanced phonology course. Despite his reluctance to engage in relations with a student, Spock becomes romantically involved with Uhura, though they are able to keep their relationship a secret.
Pavel Chekov, aged 15, becomes the youngest cadet in history to win the Starfleet Academy marathon.
  • 2257
Spock undergoes his first pon farr. Despite being bonded to T'Pring, Spock asks to join with Uhura to relieve his pon farr. Uhura ultimately accepts.
Jim Kirk is promoted to brevet lieutenant junior grade and becomes an assistant instructor in advanced hand-to-hand combat.
Montgomery Scott tests his theory of transwarp beaming on Admiral Archer's prized beagle. The dog was lost, and Scott was assigned to a Starfleet outpost on the frozen world of Delta Vega in the Vulcan system.
  • 2258
Still serving his life sentence with his crew on Rura Penthe, Nero is interrogated by the Klingons when they discover his writings and calculations from the past twenty-five years. The Klingon warden, Kolvok, learns from these documents that Nero is from the future and that he is awaiting the arrival of a Vulcan, one "Ambassador Spock." As Spock is due to arrive soon, Nero kills his captors and frees his crew, leading them on a violent escape from the prison. They kill numerous Klingons and retrieve the Narada which, despite having been dismantled, has fully regenerated thanks to the nanoprobe technology it utilizes. The Narada departs but is attacked by a fleet of 47 Klingon warships... all of which are destroyed by the Narada, despite their recent modifications.
Uhura, working in the sensor lab at the Academy, intercepts and translates the distress call from Rura Penthe. Jim Kirk overhears Uhura relay the contents of the message to her Orion roommate, Gaila.
Kirk takes the Kobayashi Maru scenario a third time and beats the test by altering the computer's programming, with the unwitting assistance of Gaila. He is brought on trial for "cheating" and is placed on Academic suspension.
Ambassador Spock, aboard the Jellyfish, emerges from the singularity. Nero and the Narada are waiting for him. Nero spares Spock's life, but abandons him on Delta Vega. The Narada then arrives at Vulcan and begins drilling into the planet's surface.
Federation sensors detect the singularity in the Klingon neutral zone, which is described as a "lightning storm in space."
Vulcan begins a planetwide evacuation, though they are hindered by the drill which is blocking communications on the majority of the planet. Vulcans on the other side of the planet are able to send out a distress call to the Federation. Believing the planet to be experiencing a natural disaster, they request that the Federation investigate and, if need be, assist in evacuations.
Earth receives Vulcan's distress call. With their primary fleet engaged in the Laurentian system, Starfleet calls on its senior-year Academy cadets to participate in the rescue mission. Kirk, being on academic suspension, is not assigned to a ship but is snuck aboard the newly-commissioned USS Enterprise by Dr. McCoy.
The Enterprise is launched under the command of Captain Pike, with Spock serving as first officer. It joins a fleet of seven starships on a rescue mission to Vulcan. The launch is delayed for several moments when Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu, the helmsman, forgets to disengage the rear inertial dampener. Hearing of the "lightning storm" that was recently detected and remembering the Klingon transmission, Kirk deduces that Vulcan is being attacked by Romulans and warns Pike of the impending trap. The Enterprise arrives at Vulcan to find the remainder of the fleet destroyed. The Narada attacks the Enterprise but stops when Nero recognizes the ship. Nero contacts the Enterprise and demands that Pike board his ship via a shuttlecraft, as transporters are inoperable while the drill is active. As Pike prepares to depart, he makes Spock acting captain and assigns Kirk as first officer. Pike takes a shuttle to the Narada, in the process dropping a team comprised of Kirk, Sulu, and Olsen onto the drill. Olsen is killed, but Kirk and Sulu are successful in deactivating the drill, allowing Enterprise to beam them and many Vulcans up to the ship. However, the drill had already reached the core of the planet.
Using red matter that was aboard Ambassador Spock's ship, Nero and his crew create a singularity at the center of Vulcan, dropping the volatile substance into the planet's core through the hole they drilled. The evacuation of Vulcan continues as the planet is consumed by the singularity. Only ten thousand Vulcans are estimated to have survived the destruction of the planet. Among the casualties are two Vulcan elders and Spock's Human mother, Amanda. On nearby Delta Vega, Ambassador Spock lays witness to his homeworld's destruction.
Nero obtains information on Earth's defenses from Captain Pike using Centaurian slugs. The Narada sets a course for Earth, armed with the means to surpass its defenses undetected.
Spock orders the Enterprise to regroup with the rest of the Federation fleet in the Laurentian system, while kirk argues that they should go after the Narada to stop it from destroying Earth and rescue Captain Pike. Following an attempted mutiny, Kirk is marooned by Spock on Delta Vega. There, he meets Ambassador Spock, who explains that he and Nero are from the future. They arrived in the past after accidentally falling into an artificial black hole created from red matter for the purpose of absorbing a supernova which threatened the entire galaxy. However, the supernova was not stopped before it destroyed Romulus, prompting Nero to seek revenge against Spock, Vulcan, and the Federation for allowing Romulus to be destroyed.
Kirk and Ambassador Spock locate the nearby Federation outpost and meet Montgomery Scott. Perfecting Scott's equation for transwarp beaming, Ambassador Spock transports Kirk and Scotty to the Enterprise. Taking Ambassador Spock's advice, Kirk exploits the younger Spock's internal sadness and anger, causing Spock to attack Kirk. Realizing he is emotionally compromised, Spock relieves himself of duty, advancing Kirk to acting captain. Kirk then orders the Enterprise to engage the Narada. Using a plan conceived by the ship's navigator, Pavel Chekov, Kirk and Spock are able to board the Narada, which has begun its attack on Earth. Spock confiscates the Jellyfish and uses it to destroy the drill, while Kirk rescues Captain Pike. Spock draws the Narada away from Earth and then proceeds to ram the Jellyfish into the enemy ship. Kirk and Spock are transported to the Enterprise before the Jellyfish collides with the Narada. The red matter that was aboard the Jellyfish is ignited and the singularity which develops consumes the Narada, killing Nero and his crew.
Kirk is promoted to captain of the Enterprise, relieving the injured Captain Pike. Spock joins his crew as first officer and Scott as chief engineer, while McCoy remains as Chief Medical Officer, Uhura as communications officer, Sulu as helmsman, and Chekov as navigator.
In response to the destruction of Vulcan and believing war with the Klingon Empire inevitable, Admiral Alexander Marcus, the newly-appointed head of Starfleet, begins secretly looking for ways to militarize Starfleet in order to better defend the Federation. He has Section 31 explore uncharted regions of space in search of advanced alien technology which could be used to improve Starfleet's defensive and offensive capabilities.
The USS Wilber, under the command of Admiral Marcus, discovers a derelict DY-100 class sleeper ship just outside the Mutara sector. They discover that the craft is designated SS Botany Bay and that it contains a large, diverse group of people from the era of Earth's Eugenics Wars, all of whom are in cryogenic stasis. One of the cryogenic chambers is automatically activated but begins to malfunction, necessitating the transport of its occupant to the Wilber. The crew find that the man has incredible strength, intelligence and recuperative abilities but learn nothing from him except that his name is "Khan." Further investigation of the Botany Bay reveals 84 more stasis units were occupied, 72 of which are still operational.
Marcus transports the remaining cryotubes to the Wilber, destroys the Botany Bay and sets course for Earth. En route, the Wilber crew learn that "Khan" is Khan Noonien Singh, the genetically-engineered tyrant who ruled over much of Earth from 1992 through 1996. Khan and his followers, all genetic "supermen" like himself, had escaped from Earth aboard the Botany Bay after their defeat in the Eugenics Wars. Khan attempts to take over the Wilber, even briefly gaining control of the ship's engineering room, but he is ultimately defeated.
Marcus brings Khan to the secret Section 31 facility in London. There, he orders Section 31 scientists to conduct tests to determine the full potential of Khan's powers and if his DNA can be used to enhance the abilities of ordinary humans. These tests show that Khan's blood could potentially have extraordinary regenerative properties; Marcus then forces Khan to undergo a series of excruciating experiments in an attempt to augment these properties. Scientists genetically modify Khan's DNA, resulting in the successful enhancement of his blood's healing abilities; Khan's platelets now have the ability to revive dying tissue in others, healing injuries and diseases that would otherwise prove fatal. The genetic modifications also have the effect of substantially altering Khan's appearance and increasing his already-superhuman strength, intellect and endurance (see also: Klingon augment virus).
With Khan's appearance altered and his abilities improved, Marcus decides to give him a new identity as an agent of Section 31, believing the peaceful Federation could benefit from Khan's savage intellect. He coerces Khan to work for him by threatening to kill his remaining 72 followers if he did not comply. He gives Khan the name "John Harrison" and sets him to work designing weapons and warships for Starfleet in preparation for war with the Klingon Empire. Marcus also uses "Harrison" in various covert operations and even has him kill Starfleet and Federation officials whom Marcus feels are threats to his cause.

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