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Talk:The Savage Curtain (episode)

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Mulney?Edit

Who is Mr. Mulney? -- Captain Mike K. Bartel 21:15, 7 Jan 2005 (CET)

A redshirt yeoman-type guy in the episode. --Gvsualan 19:04, 16 Feb 2005 (GMT)

Removed Edit

* Shatner splits his pants at 28:04 into the episode, during a fight between Kirk and Colonel Green.

Oh, please. - Bridge 12:00, 19 May 2008 (UTC)

  • When Abraham Lincoln asks if the crew still measures time in minutes Kirk says "We can convert to it." This is obviously not true, as there are numerous examples in prior episodes in which even Spock expresses time in minutes (e.g., "The Tholian Web"). However, this would make sense if one believes that the dialog and cultural references (such as units of measurement) in the series is "translated" into English from whatever future language prevails in the Federation. In that case, Lincoln's "minutes" would indeed need to be converted.
Just nitpicking — Morder 09:05, 6 December 2008 (UTC)
  • In 2003, protesters in the United States opposing the war in Iraq cited a line of dialogue from this episode as if it were an actual quote from Abraham Lincoln: "There's no honorable way to kill, no gentle way to destroy. There is nothing good in war except its ending." [1]
Removed the above, should probably be on Star Trek parodies and pop culture references.--31dot 13:27, April 19, 2011 (UTC)

Uncited Edit

I removed the following note, that has lacked citation for awhile now. If one can be found, feel free to return it:

  • Arell Blanton was hired for this episode because of his military background, needed for the welcoming ceremony for Abraham Lincoln. He was in an episode of M*A*S*H years later for the same reason.

Cleanse ( talk | contribs ) 09:51, April 6, 2010 (UTC)

IconoclasticEdit

"Iconoclastic" means something very different from "iconic". Don't a word unless you know its meaning. --The preceding unsigned comment was added by 98.199.167.80 (talk).

Do you feel it is being used incorrectly in the background note? --OuroborosCobra talk 01:58, July 8, 2010 (UTC)


Yes: "...contrasting the lionized, iconoclastic Lincoln seen in the episode, common in the 1960s, with the more worldly portrayals often found today. "

Lionized _and_ iconoclastic? From the OED:

iconoclast: "A breaker or destroyer of images; spec. (Eccl. Hist.) one who took part in or supported the movement in the 8th and 9th centuries, to put down the use of images or pictures in religious worship in the Christian churches of the East; hence, applied analogously to those Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries who practised or countenanced a similar destruction of images in the churches."

Does that sound like Lincoln or the image of Lincon in the late 60s at the same time he was being "lionized"? The writer obviously meant "Iconic"---again from the OED (2006 draft of a newer sense of the word):

"Designating a person or thing regarded as representative of a culture or movement; important or influential in a particular (cultural) context."

That sounds like the image of Lincoln in the late 60s, contrasted with "the more worldly portrayals often found today".

The writer used a word nearly the opposite of the one he meant, preferring it, apparently, because it's longer. Unfortunately, that happens a lot.

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