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Robert F. Shugrue

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Robert F. Shugrue, ACE (17 January 193727 November 1999; age 62) was a Hollywood film editor whose credits include the 1984 film, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. Born in Santa Monica, California, Shugrue has over 70 film and television projects to his credit in a career spanning three decades. He died of heart failure in Los Angeles, California.

Shugrue won an Emmy Award in Outstanding Film Editing for a Limited Series or a Special for Paramount Television's 1982 telefilm A Woman Called Golda, which starred Star Trek III actor and director Leonard Nimoy. Shugrue received additional Emmy nominations for his editing of the 1971 TV movie The Neon Calling (featuring William Smithers) and the mini-series The Thorn Birds (1983, starring Philip Anglim, Antoinette Bower, Brett Cullen, John de Lancie, Richard Kiley, Christopher Plummer, Jean Simmons, and Meg Wyllie) and Stephen King's It (featuring Dennis Christopher). He also won Eddie Awards from American Cinema Editors for his work on Thorn Birds and It earned an Eddie nomination for A Woman Called Golda.

In addition to Star Trek III, Shugrue has edited many other projects starring William Shatner. The first was the 1971 ABC Movie of the Week Owen Marshall, Counsellor at Law, which also featured Bruce Davison (and which spawned a subsequent TV series). This was followed by the unsold 1974 pilot Indict and Convict (featuring Susan Howard and Michael Pataki, with music by Jerry Goldsmith), the 1977 mini-series Testimony of Two Men (directed by Leo Penn, co-starring Theodore Bikel, Jeff Corey, John de Lancie, and Logan Ramsey, with art direction by John E. Chilberg II and hair styling by Donna Barrett Gilbert), and the 1978 TV movie The Bastard (also featuring Ian Abercrombie, Kim Cattrall, John Colicos, John de Lancie, Ike Eisenmann, James Gregory, Alex Henteloff, and James Whitmore, Jr., with stunts by Fred Carson).

Shugrue has also edited a number of TV projects for Star Trek III writer and producer Harve Bennett. Among these are the 1971 ABC Movie of the Week The Birdmen (starring Rene Auberjonois), 1975's Guilty or Innocent: The Sam Sheppard Murder Case (starring John Crawford, Gene Dynarski, Paul Fix, Jerry Hardin, Paul Lambert, Stewart Moss, George Murdock, and William Windom), and 1984's The Jesse Owens Story (starring LeVar Burton, Ronny Cox, James B. Sikking, Vic Tayback, and Ben Vereen).

Shugrue was also an editor on the 1978 mini-series Centennial, working with fellow Trek editor Howard Deane. Among the performers who worked on this program are Michael Ansara, Ed Bakey, Henry Darrow, Cliff DeYoung, Robert DoQui, Robert Easton, Alex Henteloff, Brian Keith, Sally Kellerman, Stephen McHattie, Nick Ramus, Clive Revill, Eric Server, James Sloyan, Morgan Woodward and Anthony Zerbe.

Shugrue edited three films for director John Frankenheimer: 1986's 52 Pick-Up (starring John Glover, Alex Henteloff, and Clarence Williams III), 1989's Dead Bang (featuring Frank Military), and 1990's The Fourth War. His editing credits also include such television shows as The Virginian, Ironside, and Kojak, the Leo Penn-directed 1978 mini-series The Dark Secret of Harvest Home (starring Rene Auberjonois), and feature films like Two Mules for Sister Sara (1970), Raise the Titanic (1980, with cinematography by Matthew F. Leonetti), and Street Fighter (1994).

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