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Let He Who Is Without Sin... (episode)

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"Let He Who Is Without Sin..."
DS9, Episode 5x07
Production number: 40510-505
First aired: 11 November 1996
103rd of 173 produced in DS9
103rd of 173 released in DS9
  {{{nNthReleasedInSeries_Remastered}}}th of 173 released in DS9 Remastered  
437th of 728 released in all
New Essentialists
Written By
Ira Steven Behr & Robert Hewitt Wolfe

Directed By
Rene Auberjonois
Unknown (2373)
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While Worf, Dax, Bashir, Leeta, and Quark vacation on Risa, Worf decides to join a radical fundamentalist group determined to start a political revolution on Risa.

Summary Edit

Odo and Benjamin Sisko are at the station's Replimat, discussing the coming of Miles and Keiko O'Brien's second child. Odo says that "Sean," one of their name choices, means "swamp" in Bajoran. Jadzia Dax comes in nursing a pulled neck muscle, her eighth muscle pull in several weeks and one of many injuries she has sustained since she began seeing Worf. Sisko wishes they could be romantic in a less violent way, but that's unlikely since Jadzia has managed to talk Worf into going to Risa for their vacation, instead of Earth as they originally planned. Sisko is astonished that Worf agreed to it, and wonders if he's begun to loosen up. But as the Klingon enters and orders his usual prune juice, Jadzia claims that he's the same old Worf. When he arrives, Worf says he wants to speak alone with Jadzia, and they begin to mildly argue about her having lunch with Captain Boday, a Gallamite who turns out to be one of Dax' former lovers. Soon after Sisko and Odo leave, Leeta and Dr. Bashir come in to inquire about their trip, asking if they can hitch a ride on the runabout as they seek to have their own romantic leave together. Worf, although not pleased, relents and permits them to come along. In the end, a fifth person joins them on the runabout to Risa, much to Worf's dismay: Quark, who would not give Leeta the time off unless he was permitted to tag along.

On the way to Risa, Leeta insists on serving everybody (except for Quark, her boss) their drinks. Quark is quite impatient, even though it's a relatively short trip, and his attitude almost makes Worf abort the trip altogether. Quark gives everybody but Worf a horga'hn, Risan fertility idols, which are used when achieving jamaharon, before wisely returning to his cabin on the runabout.

Quark on Risa

Quark with two horga'hn

Once on Risa, Bashir and Leeta go off on their own as promised, and Quark immediately gets lucky with his horga'hn. Worf did not change out of his uniform, and seems uncomfortable with being on Risa, though Jadzia does her best to change his mood. She almost succeeds until they are interrupted by Arandis, one of Curzon Dax's old lovers. On his last trip to Risa, Arandis ended up sending the elderly Curzon to his death during jamaharon. Worf is getting more uncomfortable by the minute, near the point of jealousy, and it's beginning to upset Jadzia greatly. She challenges his assertion that he is not too controlling of her by having a glass of icoberry juice, which they both know she is mildly allergic to. He relents from his jealousy again, and she urges him to put a swimsuit on so they can go swimming.

Worf encounters Pascal Fullerton the leader of the radical fundamentalists group "New Essentialists". These fundamentalists are attempting to start a political revolution on Risa. Their aim is to fight against loosening morals in the Federation. Fullerton explains that morals have become degenerated and amusement has a higher priority than ever before. The event is only attended by few people.

Pascal Fullerton

Fullerton, leader of New Essentialists

Meanwhile Worf and Jadzia see Bashir with another woman, not Leeta. Worf is upset about that and sees this as affirmation for the thesis of Fullerton. When they meet Leeta in the massage facility with another man, Jadzia can hardly calm him down. She explains to him that Leeta and Bashir will have their own reasons for behaving the way they are, and that they should be left to sort it out themselves.

Later, Leeta and Bashir explain that they came to Risa to break up, an old Bajoran tradition. Leeta then reveals that she has developed feelings for Rom.

The group of fundamentalists attack some Risan visitors during dinner, using phasers. When Jadzia and Worf, who are at the dinner, attempt to fight back, Fullerton calls a stop to the action. It turns out that the phaser cells are empty and Fullerton arranged the event so as to demonstrate how vulnerable the Federation has become. Worf is impressed, whereas Jadzia disagrees and tells him he can't control her and should be more relaxed.

Risa storm

A storm on Risa.

Worf sees Jadzia sculpting with Arandis and is jealous. He decides to help Fullerton make his point. With the help of the Klingon they manipulate the weather management system and make it rain, thus gaining attention.

The rain creates an unpleasant ambiance on Risa because everybody expected sunny weather. Fullerton explains his satisfaction to Worf. But when Worf leaves, the fundamentalist whispers to his assistant that all the attention will be forgotten when the weather control system restarts. He wants to take things one step further.

Meanwhile, Jadzia confronts Worf and asks him why he is so obsessed with controlling everything in his life. Worf tells her that when he was a child, he accidentally killed a classmate, Mikel, during a school soccer game when they both made a play for the ball and their heads collided. Worf saw that Humans were extremely fragile, so he decided to restrain himself so that no one else suffered.

Worf and Jadzia are alarmed by an earthquake. It doesn't take them long to realize that Fullerton has something to do with it. This time, however, he has lost the support of Worf who tells Fullerton that the Federation will persevere against the likes of the Klingons, the Dominion... and most importantly, people like him. The two then begin to fight, however Worf easily overcomes Fullerton. Worf and Jadzia manage to beat the fundamentalists and readjust the weather control system. Now even Worf sees for himself that one can relax and enjoy themselves without losing control, and he and Dax decide to make the most of their remaining vacation.

Memorable quotes Edit

"Isn't there any way for the two of you to... you know..."
"Make love?"
"...without injuring yourselves?"
"Interspecies romance isn't without its danger. That's part of the fun."

- Sisko and Jadzia Dax


"I'm looking forward to spending some time alone with Lieutenant Commander Dax."
"Isn't he sweet?"

- Worf and Dax


"Do not hug me!"

- Worf to Bashir


"Tell the Ferengi to return to his cabin!"

- Worf, to Jadzia regarding Quark on the runabout


"Now, if you don't mind, Risa awaits!"

- Quark


"I have got to take you on vacation more often."

- Jadzia to Worf


"Cute!?"
"Sexy!?"
(together) "Rom?"
(handing Bashir the Horga'hn) "Here, you need this more than I do."

- Bashir and Quark


"I've seen drier days on Ferenginar. And we have a hundred seventy-eight different words for rain. Right now it's glebbening out there. And that's bad."

- Quark


"It's the humidity - it dampens the food, makes everything mushy. Trust me...there's no word for 'crisp' on Ferenginar."

- Quark

Background Edit

Story and scriptEdit

  • The story for this episode originated in a discussion about Eugene O'Neill's 1947 play A Moon for the Misbegotten. The main theme of the play is the destructiveness of alcohol and sexuality, and the lives of several characters end in tragedy due to their pursuit of drink and sexual satisfaction. At the time it was written and first performed, the play was extremely controversial due to its frank depiction of alcoholic dependence and sexual obsession, and it was this controversy that the producers wished to replicate. According to Ira Steven Behr, "the idea was to do a show that would rattle the audience, that would show sexuality and push the envelope about Risa. Once you get past the titillation, is this a lifestyle that people in the 20th century can approve of?" (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion)

ProductionEdit

  • A number of problems occurred during the filming of "Let He Who Is Without Sin..." at a beach in Malibu, Los Angeles. For example, Terry Farrell cannot be in direct sunlight for very long, which meant that for many of the exteriors, there needed to be shelter nearby. According to director Rene Auberjonois however, for the scenes on the beach, the producers forgot to organize a tent for Farrell, and Auberjonois himself had to hunt one down and set it up, putting the shoot several hours behind schedule. Another problem involved the extras. During Monte Markham's speech, Auberjonois picked out a small bank for the extras to stand on. However, when they got to the spot, they discovered it was covered in tackburrs, making standing still exceptionally difficult, and prolonging the shoot considerably. (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion)
Leeta alternate scene

The alternate scene

Deleted sceneEdit

  • In the scene where Worf walks in on Leeta and her Risian companion in the purple mesh tank top, Leeta was originally naked and in a bath tub. This is evident in the original thirty-second promotional spot, available at startrek.com.

ReceptionEdit

  • Robert Hewitt Wolfe regards this as his least favorite episode out of all of those that he wrote or co-wrote. Ira Steven Behr has commented that if he had to choose one episode he could go back and refine, it would be this one; "It was supposed to be a show that looked at 24th century morals and sexuality. We pretty much failed on both counts." (AOL chat, 1997)
  • Similarly, Ronald D. Moore says "it's a show we all wish we had a second crack at." Director Rene Auberjonois comments "it was not my happiest time as a director." Even Alexander Siddig disliked the episode, particularly his own performance. Nana Visitor had given birth to their son the night before he shot the scene where he and Leeta break up, and according to Siddig, he had never been so unfocused on-set as he was when shooting that scene. (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion)
  • Ron Moore also commented: "I think everyone looks back at the Risa show and says, 'I wish we could take another crack at that one'. It was supposed to be a fun romp of an episode, but just didn't come through for whatever reason. I still don't think it was a bad idea, but it could have been a really cool, really fun episode. It was a great idea to go to Risa with Worf and Dax. It just didn't quite come together". ("Writing Across the Universe", Star Trek Monthly, issue 29)
  • In the eyes of Robert Hewitt Wolfe and Ira Steven Behr, the main reason the episode failed was because of restrictions placed upon how open they could be about sexuality. This was a show that was supposed to be examining sex, but it wasn't allowed to actually show any sex. As Wolfe explains, "kids watch this show, and in some markets it airs at five o'clock. That meant we couldn't show skin, so there was no sex. It became a totally asexual show, and once that happened the whole thing got flushed down the toilet because none of it made sense anymore." (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion)
  • Terry Farrell commented: "Vanessa Williams was a very good guest star. She's the tiniest human being in the world. We had two days out on the beach in Malibu, which was great. We don't get do that very often on DS9. We also had some incredibly long shooting days. I had a 20-hour day after a 17-hour day, which came after a 15-hour day. I was crying at one point because they told me were going to work that 20-hour day, and I had to be on set for the first scene of the next episode the next day. I was crying and one of our guys went to get me a tissue. He couldn't find me one, so he brought me a towel. Major, major tears right?! It was funny and I just ended up laughing". (The Official Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Magazine Vol. 18)
  • The poll run in 1999 by Sci-Fi Entertainment which saw "In the Pale Moonlight" voted as Deep Space Nine's best show, "Profit and Lace" was voted its worst, followed by "Move Along Home" and "Let He Who Is Without Sin...".

Continuity and triviaEdit

Video and DVD releases Edit

Links and referencesEdit

Starring Edit

Also starring Edit

Guest starsEdit

Special appearance byEdit

Co-starsEdit

Uncredited co-starsEdit

References Edit

Bajoran language; Berserker cat; Boday; Bolian; Borg; Cardassian; chief facilitator; clay; Dax, Curzon; Dominion; Earth; Ferengi; Ferengi language; Ferenginar; floater; gallamite; Gamma Quadrant; Gault; holosuite; Hoobishan Baths; horga'hn; hot spring; hoverball; icoberry juice; industrial replicator; jamaharon; Jem'Hadar; Kahless the Unforgettable; Klingons; Klingon Empire; Klingon High Council; Kressari; Mikel; Milky Way Galaxy; monastery; New Essentialists; Pakled; Prophets; protostar; prune juice; Quark's; rain; reyamilk; rib; Risian; Rite of Separation; Rom; Rome; Romulans; Romulan Star Empire; Rozhenko, Helena; Rozhenko, Sergey; runabout; Sean; seismic regulator; skinny dipping; snail juice; soccer; spaceport; Tarkalean tea; Temtibi Lagoon; Three Turn Bridge; tricorder; weather modification network; witness

External links Edit


Previous episode:
"Trials and Tribble-ations"
Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
Season 5
Next episode:
"Things Past"

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